2020 Equity and Inclusion Bundle

Join this bundle to experience the 2020 Virtual sessions focused on equity and inclusion. This session collection focuses on equitable and inclusive programming, facility design, ADA accessibility, and health and wellness. Upon completion, the sessions included in this bundle are eligible for 0.4 CEU. The three Speed Sessions are included for no additional cost and eligible for a total of 0.1 CEU.


Sessions included in this bundle:

  1. Data-Driven Strategies for Equitable Urban Park Investment (0.1 CEU)
  2. Building Facilities and Programs that Reflect the Values of Inclusiveness and Diversity (0.1 CEU) 
  3. Inclusion Matters: How to Bring Inclusion to Recreation Programming (0.1 CEU) 
  4. Public Accessibility for Transgender Populations (0.1 CEU)
  5. Expanding Local Park Programs: Free Fly Fishing for Disabled/Elderly Veterans (0.034 CEU)
  6. Paws and Recreation: Service Dogs, ADA Accessibility and You (0.034 CEU)
  7. Supporting Inclusive Health Through Parks and Recreation (0.034 CEU) 



NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

  • The Gathering Place: Inclusive Design for Everyone

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual Conference session to learn more about The Gathering Place, a 100-acre inclusive park serving residents of all backgrounds park in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

    The Gathering Place is a new 100-acre park in Tulsa, Oklahoma. The $465-million park provides multiple features from a sport court, skate area, boating facilities, water features and large playground. The overall goal is to be an inclusive park no matter your racial, ethnic, economic or ability level. Tulsa was the site of the single-worst incident of racial violence in American history, with approximately 300 African American residents killed in a 1921 riot. The location of The Gathering Place is the middle of Tulsa's diverse neighborhoods. The intent is to provide a neutral location for residents of all backgrounds to intermingle and to get to know each other no matter their differences. The park was voted as the best new attraction in the United States by USA Today newspaper, but, more importantly, was recognized by Time Magazine and the top "100 Worlds Greatest Places" to experience in 2019.


    Learning Objectives

    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand how the design and location of a park can be used as a place for people of all ages, economic levels, racial background, disability, etc. to enjoy and interact. 
    2. Understand how the use of Universal Design, can exceed accessibility standards and allow people with multiple or severe disabilities to enjoy an outdoor setting.


    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Mark Trieglaff

    President, ACTServices, Inc.

    Mark Trieglaff has a Bachelor Degree in Outdoor and Therapeutic Recreation and a Masters Degree in Park and Recreation Administration with a Therapeutic Recreation emphasis. He has been in the disability field for over 30 years starting as a Recreation Therapist at Northeast DuPage Special Recreation Association, Access Coordinator for People with Disabilities at Brookfield Zoo, Project Manager at LCM Architects that had a specialty in accessibility review and now President of Accessibility Consultation and Training Services, Inc. (ACTServices, Inc.) for the past 6 years. Mark is also a certified Wilderness Leader from the Wilderness Education Association started by Paul Petzoldt who also started the National Outdoor Leadership School.

    The overall program at Brookfield Zoo was to provide adaptive educational programs for zoo guests with disabilities, provide access of exhibits and facilities, and provide effective communication through various means. The Brookfield Zoo access program won the Accessible Museum of the Year Award from the American Association of Museums in a National competition and featured on a CD called Universal Design Exemplars by the Center for Universal Design in an International competition.

    At LCM, he involved in projects across the country. The projects included activities such as plan reviews, accessibility code interpretation, construction site reviews, transition plan development, reasonable accommodation recommendations, policy and procedure reviews, etc. He also participated in two Department of Justice lawsuits (College Square Mall in Cedar Falls, Iowa and the University of Chicago) and one Illinois States Attorney lawsuit (Walgreen Corporation).

    Mark began Accessibility Consultation and Training Services, Inc. 2007 and has provided reviews of over 500 separate parks and facilities include the Chicago Park District, Park District of Oak Park and Elmhurst Park District to name a few.

    He is presently providing training for the Michigan Recreation and Park Association members around the state to assist them with the development of their Transition Plans. These trainings will provide participants with the background in the ADA and the requirements of a Transition Plan as well as practical fieldwork to provide them hands on experience in how to take accurate measurements for their reports.

    He has spoke extensively on Transition Plans and accessibility including presentations at the Illinois Park and Recreation Association, the Michigan Recreation and Park Association, the Florida Recreation and Park Association, the American Zoo and Aquarium Association, the American Association of Museums, American Therapeutic Recreation Association and the National Recreation and Park Association. He recently presented at the International Conference on Universal Design in Lund Sweden. The topic was the inclusion of Universal Design in a small park and playground in Woodridge Illinois.

  • Supporting Inclusive Health Through Parks and Recreation

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual discussion with NRPA and a self-advocate with intellectual disabilities to learn about the importance of inclusivity and the impact that a newly developed inclusive health policy best practice guide can have on communities across the country.

    For centuries, individuals with intellectual disabilities have been one of the most marginalized and alienated populations in our society. Park and recreation agencies have the ability to not only provide inclusive health solutions that foster healthy activities with participation by both individuals with and without intellectual disabilities, helping to not only break down barriers to physical health but also address stigma and alienation and improve social and emotional health. Join NRPA and a self-advocate with an intellectual disability to discuss the importance of inclusivity, and the impact a newly developed inclusive health policy best practice guide can have on communities across the country.


    Following this session, learners will be able to: 

    1. Learn ways to promote inclusive health through park and recreation programs and policies. 


    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Kathleen Maggi

    Health Messenger

    Special Olympics

    Maureen Neumann

    Program Manager

    National Recreation and Park Association

    Maureen Neumann is a Program Manager for the National Recreation and Park Association. As a part of the Health and Wellness team, she focuses on healthy out-of-school time programming and inclusive practices in parks and recreation. 

  • Paws and Recreation: Service Dogs, ADA Accessibility and You

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This 2020 NRPA Virtual speed session discusses the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) laws and best practices for service dogs in public facilities; along with, the differences among various service dogs.

    Learn the facts about service dogs from true service dog trainers. This speed session will discuss the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) laws and best practices for service dogs in your public facilities. It also will differentiate task-trained service dogs, therapy dogs, emotional support animals, and anything else that might come through your doors. New Horizons Service Dogs Inc. is a service dog training nonprofit that supplies task-trained service dogs to clients free of cost.

    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Identify ADA laws with Service Dogs.
    2. Understand how the ADA laws relate to organizations. 


    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Hannah Cooper

    Athletic Supervisor

    Sports Facilities Management, LLC

    Hannah Cooper is an Athletic Supervisor with the City of Port Orange Parks and Recreation. In her "spare" time she raises task trained service dogs through New Horizons Service Dogs Inc. in Orange City. She looks to educate and bring awareness to service dogs in the recreation industry and what ADA accessibility looks like for your organization.

    Wendy Hartman

    New Horizons Service Dogs Inc.

    Wendy Hartman is a retired teacher and now the Assistant Director for New Horizons Service Dogs Inc, located in Orange City. She has trained numerous dogs and presented on the topic countless times. Wendy has a wealth of knowledge on ADA laws and the relationship to public spaces.

  • Expanding Local Park Programs: Free Fly Fishing for Disabled/Elderly Veterans

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual Conference archive to learn how public-private partnerships allow local communities to offer non-standard programs to disabled and elderly veterans.

    Veterans today suffer greatly from mental health and suicide. These especially are relevant to veterans who are disabled (combat or otherwise), elderly, or suffer from PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) or MST (Military Sexual Trauma). The creation of a public-private partnership with veteran organizations, local Trout Unlimited chapters, and local park and recreation agencies allow local communities to offer non-standard programs at little to no cost that leverage resources not usually available to local park and recreation staff. The benefit of such developed programs helps targeted groups, in this case, disabled or elderly veterans, to get out of the house or apartment and reconnect socially with others, as well as learn lifelong skills that may help veterans and promote positive mental health outcomes.

    Learning Objectives

    Following this session, participants will be able to: 

    1. Effectively target and identify the issues that exist within local communities of disabled/Elderly Veterans to include PTSD/MST or combat disabled Veterans.




    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Jim Lindenmayer

    Director

    Cherokee County Homeless Veterans Program/American Legion

    Jim is a 1980 graduate of the West Point and served in the Army for 13 years. He grew up in Up State New York where he learned to fish and hunt at an early age. He serves as the Service Officer for the Canton Ga American Legion, Director of the Cherokee County Homeless Veteran Program, and is a member of the TRIAD SALT and Cherokee County Suicide taskforce.

  • Public Accessibility for Transgender Populations

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session for an in-depth discussion on public access to public washrooms, locker rooms, and inclusive facilities for transgender populations. The session offers lessons learned from the frontlines and the first federal court case regarding transgender populations and accessibility to facilities.

    The issue of public access to public washrooms, locker rooms, and inclusive facilities is growing and the legal and court case law is expanding and changing every year. This session will identify the legal history, mandates, and changing requirements for public facility operators. In addition, lessons learned from the frontlines and first federal court case regarding transgender populations and accessibility to facilities. In addition, learn how to assess your current facilities to ensure effective operations and approaches, as well as key policies and staff training that is imperative to survive this sensitive subject matter. Lastly, learn life experiences, biases, and simple expectations from a full-time trans-female, who is an advocate. This will enable more people to understand how to have inclusive facilities for transgender populations.


    Following this session, participants will be able to:

    1. Learn the legal history, mandates, and implications involved with making public facilities, workplaces, and programs inclusive for transgender populations.
    2. Develop best practices for inclusive public access. 

    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Keri-Lyn Krafthefer

    Equity Partner

    Ancel Glink Diamond Bush DiCianni & Krafthefer, P.C.

    Keri-Lyn Krafthefer is an equity partner with the Illinois law firm of Ancel Glink and Associates, which represents numerous Illinois local governments, including park districts. Krafthefer has been teaching public bodies and public officials about the evolving laws relating to transgender populations for several years, and she has spoken before national and international attorneys’ groups on this topic.

    Michael Clark

    Executive Director

    Palatine Park District, IL

    Mike Clark has presented on this topic at several conferences. He has experience in the access of public facilities for transgender populations as the first federal court case of locker room access ever filed was in Palatine, Illinois. Clark has developed a strategy and approach to provide an all-inclusive culture in recreational facilities and policies to help train staff and educate the public on this topic.

    Sophie Michaels

    Full Time Transgender Woman Panelist

    Private Citizen

    Sophie Michaels is an open transgender woman and has been living “full time” for several years now. This is her second year of speaking out to students and professionals (e.g., the Illinois Park and Recreation Conference, staff meetings and college classrooms) about her struggles, challenges and life experiences. She shares insight and advice for a better understanding of the transgender population.

  • Inclusion Matters: How to Bring Inclusion to Recreation Programming

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session to gain knowledge and understand why inclusion matters and how to successfully implement inclusion in recreation programming. We will discuss techniques and resources for successful inclusion.

    Participants in this session about inclusion will gain knowledge and experience about why it matters and how to successfully implement inclusion in recreation programming. Basic information about Denver (Colorado) Parks and Recreation and serving people with disabilities and people-first language will prequel the process Denver Adaptive Recreation went through to formalize its Inclusion Support Services throughout its 30 recreation centers. We will share techniques and resources for successful inclusion, including best practices and testimonials. In addition, participants will have an opportunity to develop solutions for inclusion from situational group discussions.


    Learning Objectives

    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Identify why inclusion is important and necessary for recreation programs.
    2. Gain knowledge and resources on how to provide successful inclusion in their recreation department/facility.
    3. Implement people-first language in interactions with their community.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Leah Huffer-Solomon

    Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist (CTRS)Senior Recreation Therapist

    As a Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist, Leah Huffer-Solomon has worked for the city and county of Denver Adaptive Recreation department for the past 17 years. She and her department have been supporting inclusion and have recently formalized their process of providing successful inclusion in all of the 30 Denver recreation centers. Huffer-Solomon has been an advocate for people with disabilities for more than 20 years.

  • Building Facilities and Programs that Reflect the Values of Inclusiveness and Diversity

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session and discover new and innovative ways to ensure that your organization's events, facilities, and programs are meeting today's expectations for inclusive design.

    Recreation providers in enlightened communities understand their programs must reflect the diversity of their citizenry for maximum success. But have you thought about whether your facilities, along with your recreation programs and events, meet today's expectations for inclusive design? Upon completion of this session, participants will be equipped with new ideas and a comprehensive understanding of ways to improve your community's inclusivity score.

    Learning Objectives

    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Discuss the history of inclusiveness & diversity in parks & recreation. 
    2. Identify the categories of diversity when designing 
    3. Evaluate opportunities in the design process to positively impact diversity and inclusiveness in facility design and construction.
    4. Discuss numerous programming opportunities to meet community needs for celebrating diversity and encouraging inclusiveness.
    5. Determine the operational plans needed to meet these standards.


    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Jim Browne

    Director of Recreation Planning

    Brinkley Sargent Wiginton Architects

    Jim Browne is a former president of Texas Recreation and Parks Society (TRAPS), and has served as chairman of NRPA’s Rocky Mountain Revenue and Management School. His agencies have received Gold Medal Awards for Administrative and Management Excellence from both TRAPS and NRPA. Browne has spoken at numerous NRPA, TRAPS, ICMA, TML and Athletic Business conferences over the past four decades.

    Stephen Springs

    Senior Principal

    Brinkley Sargent Wiginton Arschitects

    During his tenure with Brinkley Sargent Wiginton, Stephen Springs has evolved from intern architect to senior principal and the firm’s leader in the planning and design of quality-of-life projects, such as recreation, aquatic and active adult facilities. He has led the development of numerous award-winning projects, which has led to opportunities to serve as a judge for Athletic Business’ Facility of Merit award (2014) and Recreation Management’s Innovative Architecture Award (2007). Springs is a frequent contributing author to industry periodicals on the subject of designing recreation projects.

  • Data-Driven Strategies for Equitable Urban Park Investment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join NRPA in this Virtual 2020 session and discover how a representative group of cities and urban areas are using data-driven equity criteria to guide and prioritize park investment to ensure equitable urban park investment. City Parks Alliance and its city representatives will present their research findings, including data-sets used, policies enacted, and best practices for replication.

    Historic disinvestment has left many low-income communities and communities of color without access to quality parks and recreation opportunities. To ensure more equitable funding approaches and to address the backlog created by historic disinvestment, a number of cities are beginning to establish data-driven equity criteria to guide park investment. City Parks Alliance surveyed six cities and one urban county Detroit, Minneapolis, New York City, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, San Francisco, and Los Angeles County that have established equity criteria and are now using that criteria to prioritize their capital, operating, and programming investments. Through thoughtful data analysis and proactive community engagement, these municipalities are assessing community needs, and using that assessment to design new parks and improve existing ones. City Parks Alliance and its city representatives will present their research findings, including data-sets used, policies enacted, and best practices for replication.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to: 

    1. Compare data collection methods used by each city and then determine the best approach to develop data-driven equity criteria appropriate for their own city’s needs.
    2. Discuss how city officials and partners engaged all sectors of the community for buy-in to the equity funding plan and then will determine strategies for their own community. 
    3. Use the five best practices developed by City Parks Alliance’s study to incorporate data-driven equity methodology into practice for their own city.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Julie Waterman

    Advocacy Director

    City Parks Alliance

    Julie Waterman has 20 years of experience with prestigious nonprofit conservation and family planning organizations, focusing on advocacy, coalition building, board management, fundraising and public relations.

    Jayne Miller

    Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy

    Mitchell Silver

    NYC Department of Parks and Recreation

    Meagan Elliot

    Detroit Parks and Recreation Division