Design and Maintenance Bundle

imageThis bundle includes sessions curated from the NRPA 2018 Annual Conference on the topic of design and maintenance. Included in this bundle are the following sessions: 

  • More Design Glitches & Building Blunders

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered

    Drawing from the experience of over 220 projects built over the last 30 years, this session uncovers even more of the top lessons learned shared by community leaders, operators, contractors and designers.

    imageHindsight is 20/20. “What would you do differently?” is the question owners should be asking prior to planning and building a new community recreation center. Drawing from the experience of over 220 projects built over the last 30 years, this session uncovers even more of the top lessons learned shared by community leaders, operators, contractors and designers.

    Craig Bouck, AIA, LEED AP

    CEO, Principal, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture

    Craig is a frequent speaker and author in the recreation design industry. For the past two decades, he has worked with recreation professionals to design value-driven projects that solve problems, create opportunities and build community. Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture has been involved in more than 200 community recreation projects across the country, providing feasibility studies, conceptual designs and award-winning architectural and interior design services.

    Mick Massey, RLA

    Texas Regional Director, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture

    Mick’s 29 years of experience in municipal government is value added to any community project. His experience as a former Parks and Recreation Director drives his passion for professionals and agencies to “plan your work, and work your plan,” especially when it comes to recreation center planning. Mick’s enthusiasm for public projects is contagious and his knowledge of local government is extremely helpful. He is a registered landscape architect, park planner, and a master at building public consensus.

  • Advocacy by design: Innovations in parks and public places for building diverse constituencies

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered

    Experts from five cities working on the ground will share how the Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative is demonstrating that innovative, meaningful engagement can result in public places that serve us all—and that yield greater advocacy, stewardship, equity and even funding.

    imageIn five cities, civic leaders and parks professionals are collaborating with local communities to reinvigorate civic assets in a way that attracts a wide range of people—and cultivates long-term advocacy for parks and public places among diverse constituencies. This session explores ongoing efforts in Akron, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis and Philadelphia to reinvent how cities and local organizations engage people in improving, programming and maintaining civic assets. Experts working on the ground in the cities will share how the Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative is demonstrating that innovative, meaningful engagement can result in public places that serve us all—and that yield greater advocacy, stewardship, equity and even funding.

    Alexa Brush

    Landscape Architect and Planner, City of Detroit

    Carol Coletta

    Senior Fellow, Kresge Foundation American Cities Practice

    Carol Coletta is president and CEO of the Memphis River Parks Partnership. She is leading the relaunch of a nonprofit to develop, manage and program six miles of riverfront and five park districts along the Mississippi River.

    She is on loan from The Kresge Foundation where she is a senior fellow in the foundation’s American Cities Practice.  She leads a $50+ million collaboration of national and local foundations, local nonprofits and governments to Reimagine the Civic Commons in five cities.  It is planned as the first comprehensive demonstration of how a connected set of civic assets – a civic commons – can yield increased and more widely share prosperity for cities and neighborhoods.  

    Demetrius Lambert-Falconer

    Outreach Manager, Summit Metro Parks

    Gia Biagi

    Principal of Urbanism and Civic Impact, Studio Gang

    Gia Biagi is a Principal at Studio Gang, an architecture and urban design collective located in Chicago, New York, and San Francisco.  Gia is widely regarded as a thought leader around issues related to cities and public space and guides the Studio’s urbanism and civic impact work.

    At Studio Gang, she leads design teams, coordinates master plans, facilitates community engagement, and directs the urban design approach for projects across the United States.  Prior to joining Studio Gang, Gia spent sixteen years working for the City of Chicago, including posts at the Park District as Director of Planning, Director of Strategy and Policy, and Chief of Staff.  Gia also serves as President of NeighborSpace, a non-profit land trust that provides community-based management and long-term protection to over 100 urban gardens in neighborhoods across Chicago.  

    Kathryn Ott Lovell

    Commissioner, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation

    Kathryn Ott Lovell serves as the Commissioner of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation where she leads more than 700 employees and oversees the city’s parkland, playgrounds, recreation centers, trails and thousands of programs and events. She is credited with the recent “Reimagining the Civic Commons” initiative, a program underway to re-imagine the city’s vast and beloved parks as destinations where residents can gather and connect with their community in a meaningful way.

     Under Commissioner Ott Lovell’s leadership, the Philadelphia Parks and Recreation Department will experience a drastic transformation over the next eight years through the city’s “Rebuilding Community Infrastructure” project, otherwise referred to as “Rebuild.” The Rebuild project is a massive effort to invest nearly half a billion dollars over the next six years to improve the city’s civic assets. As a private- and public-funded venture, the project intends to use the city’s public spaces as a way to promote social connectivity, elevate community engagement, and bring equity to some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods.

    Ms. Ott Lovell currently serves on the boards of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Please Touch Museum, the Schuylkill River Development Corporation and the Philadelphia Sports Congress. She lives in West Philadelphia with her husband, Andrew, and two daughters, Lucy and Johanna. 

  • Keeping up with Capital Replacements; Crawl, Walk Run

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered

    The session will show one agency’s progress in addressing this issue over a 15-year time span. It will focus on three phases of solving this problem; first - measuring and projecting needs, second - prioritizing funding of current replacements, and third - building reserves for to ensure sustainable funding.

    imageFunding for replacing aging assets can be overwhelming, especially in an environment of resource scarcity. While there are no easy answers or magic solutions, this session will provide guidance on how to create a replacement funding strategy that will put your agency on the path toward financial sustainability. The session will show one agency’s progress in addressing this issue over a 15-year time span. It will focus on three phases of solving this problem; first - measuring and projecting needs, second - prioritizing funding of current replacements, and third - building reserves for to ensure sustainable funding.

    Keith Hobson

    Director of Business & Facilities, Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District

    Mr. Hobson is the Director of Business & Facilities, and has been with Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District 17 years. Prior to entering public administration he spent 10 years as a practicing CPA with a focus on business planning. Mr. Hobson is active with the Special Districts Association of Oregon, serving on both the Board of Directors and the Legislative Committee. He has a Bachelor degree in Accounting from the University of Oregon, and a Masters in Public Administration from Portland State University.

    Mr. Hobson is an active volunteer in his community, recently completing 12 years of serving on the Washington County Audit Committee, and currently serving on the board of a local non-profit affordable housing development agency.

  • Shaping Space for Civic Life: The pivotal role of parks

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered

    This session will introduce the Assembly initiative and its evidence-based approach to shaping community design, with an emphasis on parks and open space. Panelists will reflect on historic and emerging research that points to the connection between the built environment and civic participation, and share a range of project examples that seek to enhance civic life through design interventions.

    imageCommunities across the United States face concerning trends related to civic life, including distrust, low voter turnout, and growing social and economic divides. Public space professionals, civic leaders, and community residents alike are interested in re-building trust, revitalizing neighborhoods, and supporting interaction among diverse groups. Promising initiatives are emerging across the country to transform lagging public spaces into dynamic, welcoming, and celebrated ones. In light of these trends, the Center for Active Design has launched “Assembly: Shaping Space for Civic Life,” a pioneering initiative to leverage place-based design as a tool to enhance civic engagement. The Assembly initiative has surfaced groundbreaking information, including quantifiable civic life metrics, as well as causal findings demonstrating that design elements do indeed impact civic perceptions. This session will introduce the Assembly initiative and its evidence-based approach to shaping community design, with an emphasis on parks and open space. Panelists will reflect on historic and emerging research that points to the connection between the built environment and civic participation, and share a range of project examples that seek to enhance civic life through design interventions. Conversations will leave participants with a better understanding of practical strategies for shaping parks through design, programming, and maintenance practices that can enhance civic life in their own communities.

    Jennifer Mahar

    Senior Director of Civic Initiatives at Fairmount Park Conservancy

    Jennifer joined the Fairmount Park Conservancy, non-profit champion of Philadelphia's 10,000 park system, in 2012.   As Senior Director of Civic Initiatives, Jennifer helps oversee 'Reimagining the Civic Commons' - an innovative, collaborative network of public space organizations in Philadelphia. Together, the collective demonstrates ways that civic assets can be connected as an integrated system and how they can be developed to foster talent, opportunity and engagement.   In addition, we partner with leading researchers to experiment with programmatic and design interventions that will help us inform how citizens access civic assets.  Jennifer oversees the Neighborhood Parks Stewardship Program, a unique partnership with Philadelphia Parks & Recreation and our network of 100 volunteer park friend groups.  Together we organize, resource and celebrate our wonderful city parks and the volunteers who advocate for them.

    Maria Nardi

    Deputy Director, Miami-Dade County Parks, Recreation, and Open Spaces

    Maria is deputy director of the Miami-Dade County Dept of Parks, Recreation, and Open Space Dept, which is on the front lines of dealing with the effects of climate change, sea-level rise, and extreme weather events. Maria directs staff in managing parks and rec facilities and adapting to climate change and mitigating the effects of climate change. She has direct knowledge and experience that is invaluable in understanding how parks must face the future. Maria is an accomplished presenter and speaker with experience presenting at the national, regional, and state level.

    Maria I. Nardi has over 18 years experience in the private and public sector in the fields of urban design, landscape architecture, architecture, planning and preservation. In the private sector, she received the University of Miami Alumna of the Year Award for her holistic, comprehensive planning work as Chief of Planning and Research for Miami-Dade County, where she directed the vision for the Miami-Dade County Park and Open Space Master Plan; a vision for a more equitable, greener and healthier Miami-Dade County, and for her work as Chief of Urban Design for the City of Miami where she initiated Miami 21; a rewrite of the City's land development regulations from land use segregation to mixed use regulations to promote a walkable, pedestrian friendly community. Ms. Nardi's community based planning initiatives and collaborative work also received the International Progressive Architecture Award for Urban Design, for the “Redland: A Preservation and Tourism Plan”, a vision to preserve and rebuild the agricultural heritage of South Dade through Agri-tourism. Ms. Nardi received her undergraduate degree in Architecture from the University of Miami and her Masters in Landscape Architecture from Harvard University Graduate School of Design where she received the Harvard American Society of Landscape Architects Honor Award for excellence in the study of Landscape Architecture.

    Suzanne Nienaber

    Partnerships Director, Center for Active Design

    I'm an urban planner and facilitator striving to shape healthier, more engaged communities. As the partnerships director at the Center for Active Design (CfAD) I help people collaborate across sectors to elevate physical, mental, social, and civic well-being in their projects, and inspire transformative community change. Our work draws upon scholarly research and bridges a wide range of disciplines — embracing everything from urban planning and architecture to public health, political science, real estate development, facilities management, and more.

    I lead a range of initiatives at CfAD, including Assembly, our pioneering effort to understand how place-based design informs civic engagement objectives such as trust, participation in public life, and stewardship. Through this initiative we’re convening expert advisors, undertaking original research, and synthesizing findings on the relationship between place-based design and civic life.