NRPA 2017 Conference Conservation Bundle

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This is as bundle of 3 sessions recorded from the NRPA 2017 Annual Conference on the topic of "Conservation." Included in this package are the following sessions: 

  • Conservation Partnerships for Parks & Recreation: A core mission of public park agencies is to acquire land for parks or conservation areas and to protect local natural resources. America’s open space is disappearing at a rate of 6,000 acres per day. The Trust for Public Land and other conservation driven non-profit organizations, in partnership with local parks and recreation agencies, can change this trend. Understanding conservation partnership examples and best practices can be helpful to park and recreation agencies across the country. The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.
  • The Ecological Age: Ushering a New Age for Parks in the Face of Climate Change: Climate change has overwhelmingly been recognized as one of the most urgent threats to our communities and our environment. Parks play a unique role in providing respite, infrastructure, adaptation and mitigation strategies for urban communities. The focus on climate change and adaptation provides a unique opportunity for a new ecological era for parks with a focus on investment in restoration and protection of natural areas.
  • Wildlife Management in A Public Park Setting: Managing the Sometimes Unmanageable Wildlife vs. human interactions is a growing concern for liability and health officials. Participants will be exposed to the process toward developing a workable solution for mitigating wildlife issues within their parks. Specific case studies will be presented on Canada goose overpopulation and vulture-roosting management plans. Included in this presentation will be specific strategies for establishing cooperative agreements, partnerships and permits necessary for sustainable management plans.
  • Conservation Partnerships for Parks & Recreation

    Contains 5 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.

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    A core mission of public park agencies is to acquire land for parks or conservation areas and to protect local natural resources. America’s open space is disappearing at a rate of 6,000 acres per day. The Trust for Public Land and other conservation driven non-profit organizations, in partnership with local parks and recreation agencies, can change this trend. Understanding conservation partnership examples and best practices can be helpful to park and recreation agencies across the country. The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.

    Session outcomes:

    • Participants will be able to identify strategies to promote collaboration with non-profit, community service organizations for conservation outcomes with proven economic benefits for the community.
    • Participants will be able to identify the strategies and steps needed to acquire, protect, program and manage public lands for conservation purposes.
    • Participants will be able to discuss how conservation non-profit organizations such as The Trust for Public Land collaborate with community park agencies to achieve success.

    James Garges, CPRP

    Director, Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department

    James R. Garges is the Director of the Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department. Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation is the largest department in North Carolina with over 480 employees, over 22,000 acres of park land and an operating budget of $33 million. The Department was selected for the National Park and Recreation Gold Medal Award as the top department in the country with a population of over 250,000 residents. He formerly was Director of the Cincinnati Recreation Commission- Cincinnati, Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Park Administration and Master of Science in Recreation Park Administration from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He has spoken at numerous NRPA Congress sessions.

    Kent Whitehead

    Senior Project Manager and Director, Chesapeake and Carolinas Office, The Trust for Public Land

    Kent serves as a Senior Project Manager for Land Protection and Director of the Trust for Public Land’s Chesapeake and Carolinas Office. With nearly 20 years of experience in land conservation, he has completed over thirty conservation transactions in nine states. Currently he oversees Trust for Public Land projects and programs in the Chesapeake Bay area and the Carolinas, and assists with real estate transactions in other states. He holds a master's degree in City Planning and has education and experience in Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development. Kent lives in Washington, DC.

    Michael Hecker, CPRP

    Parks and Recreation Director, City of Elk River

    Michael Hecker became the City of Elk River’s second full time Parks and Recreation Director when he was hired in October 2011. Prior to coming to Elk River, Mr. Hecker served the City of Mason Ohio as their Parks and Recreation Director for eleven years. Mr. Hecker also worked as the Parks, Culture and Recreation Director for the City of Unalaska, Alaska from 1996 through 2000. He received his Bachelor of Science in Operations Management from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and Master of Science in Recreation Administration from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Michael was recently a speaker at the NRPA Congress in St. Louis and has been a regular presenter for past NRPA Congress sessions and MRPA state conferences.

  • Wildlife Management in a Public Park Setting: Managing the Sometimes Unmanageable

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered

    Wildlife vs. human interactions is a growing concern for liability and health officials. Participants will be exposed to the process toward developing a workable solution for mitigating wildlife issues within their parks.

    image

    Wildlife vs. human interactions is a growing concern for liability and health officials. Participants will be exposed to the process toward developing a workable solution for mitigating wildlife issues within their parks. Specific case studies will be presented on Canada goose overpopulation and vulture-roosting management plans. Included in this presentation will be specific strategies for establishing cooperative agreements, partnerships and permits necessary for sustainable management plans.

    Session outcomes:

    • Attendees will learn to discover the root of the issue, mitigate concerns, and develop a sustainable solution towards management providing positive recreational value without eroding the ecosystem.
      Attendees will be provided the legal and ethical issues that surround sound wildlife management practices. Necessary partnerships with wildlife agencies will be discussed.
      Attendees will be provided with an understanding of what is sustainable conservation practices and avoiding the quick fix mentality often requested from both the public and elected officials.
  • The Ecological Age: Ushering a New Age for Parks in the Face of Climate Change

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.10 credits offered Recorded On: 09/28/2017

    Climate change has overwhelmingly been recognized as one of the most urgent threats to our communities and our environment. Parks play a unique role in providing respite, infrastructure, adaptation and mitigation strategies for urban communities. The focus on climate change and adaptation provides a unique opportunity for a new ecological era for parks with a focus on investment in restoration and protection of natural areas.

    image

    Climate change has overwhelmingly been recognized as one of the most urgent threats to our communities and our environment. Parks play a unique role in providing respite, infrastructure, adaptation and mitigation strategies for urban communities. The focus on climate change and adaptation provides a unique opportunity for a new ecological era for parks with a focus on investment in restoration and protection of natural areas.

    The urgent need to address climate change coupled with parks unique role in addressing the effects of climate change provides a unique opportunity to position parks to emerge as leaders and usher in an ecological era where government, business, and all stakeholders invest in the protection and restoration of parklands as a means of adaptation and mitigation of the effects of climate change.

    Competencies: 

    • How to communicate the value of parks and role in climate change adaptation; 
    • Funding strategies to facilitate restoration and natural resource management; and
    • Balancing ecological restoration with infrastructure services and outdoor recreation.