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  • NRPA 2017 Conference Conservation Bundle

    Contains 3 Product(s)

    This is as bundle of 3 sessions recorded from the NRPA 2017 Annual Conference on the topic of "Conservation." Included in this package are the following sessions: Conservation Partnerships for Parks & Recreation, The Ecological Age: Ushering a New Age for Parks in the Face of Climate Change, and Wildlife Management in a Public Park Setting: Managing the Sometimes Unmanageable.

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    This is as bundle of 3 sessions recorded from the NRPA 2017 Annual Conference on the topic of "Conservation." Included in this package are the following sessions: 

    • Conservation Partnerships for Parks & Recreation: A core mission of public park agencies is to acquire land for parks or conservation areas and to protect local natural resources. America’s open space is disappearing at a rate of 6,000 acres per day. The Trust for Public Land and other conservation driven non-profit organizations, in partnership with local parks and recreation agencies, can change this trend. Understanding conservation partnership examples and best practices can be helpful to park and recreation agencies across the country. The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.
    • The Ecological Age: Ushering a New Age for Parks in the Face of Climate Change: Climate change has overwhelmingly been recognized as one of the most urgent threats to our communities and our environment. Parks play a unique role in providing respite, infrastructure, adaptation and mitigation strategies for urban communities. The focus on climate change and adaptation provides a unique opportunity for a new ecological era for parks with a focus on investment in restoration and protection of natural areas.
    • Wildlife Management in A Public Park Setting: Managing the Sometimes Unmanageable Wildlife vs. human interactions is a growing concern for liability and health officials. Participants will be exposed to the process toward developing a workable solution for mitigating wildlife issues within their parks. Specific case studies will be presented on Canada goose overpopulation and vulture-roosting management plans. Included in this presentation will be specific strategies for establishing cooperative agreements, partnerships and permits necessary for sustainable management plans.
  • City of New Orleans: Strategic Urban Water Management and Recreation Opportunities

    Contains 5 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/27/2017

    This session will catalyze interest in the development of strategic water-management interventions at recreation sites and their comprehensive maintenance. The presentation will review the New Orleans approach to urban-water management and highlight the many opportunities to uplift healthy activities and recreation through the program. We will also explore ways in which different public, private and community entities can participate in the collective operations and maintenance of the projects.

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    The City of New Orleans is undertaking an unprecedented network of integrated initiatives designed to reduce flood risk, improve health, and adapt our city to a changing natural environment. As an urban landscape the City has identified that it is advantageous to focus interventions at parks to assist in Stormwater Management. After significant rain events or storm-surge flooding recreational facilities are put offline until they can be restored back in service.

    This session will catalyze interest in the development of strategic water-management interventions at recreation sites and their comprehensive maintenance. The presentation will review the New Orleans approach to urban-water management and highlight the many opportunities to uplift healthy activities and recreation through the program. We will also explore ways in which different public, private and community entities can participate in the collective operations and maintenance of the projects.

    Session outcomes:

    • Participants will be able to discuss Resiliency and Urban Water Management and describe examples of Stormwater Management and Green Infrastructure Projects.
    • Participants will be able to explain the benefits of Urban Water Management projects for recreational and educational use.
    • Demonstrate how operations and maintenance can be leveraged to minimize disruptions by incorporation of Green Infrastructure.

    Jeffrey Hebert

    Deputy Mayor, Chief Administrative Officer and Chief Resilience Officer, City of New Orleans

    Jeff Hebert was appointed Deputy Mayor and Chief Administrative Officer in August 2016, and continues to serve as the City of New Orleans’ first Chief Resilience Officer. In this capacity, he oversees the administration of City Hall and leads the Mayor’s efforts to improve city government performance and the Mayor’s charge to return the city to fiscal stability. As Chief Resilience Officer, Hebert oversees the implementation of the nation’s first Comprehensive Resilience Strategy, development of the city’s climate action plan and sea level rise and climate adaptation strategies, and was recently appointed by Governor John Bel Edwards to the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Coastal Protection, Restoration, and Conservation.

    Katie Dignan

    Project Delivery Unit Manager, City of New Orleans

    Katie Dignan joined the City of New Orleans as the Project Delivery Unit Manager in March of 2011. In this capacity she is responsible for the fiscal management of the City’s Capital and Infrastructure Budget. Since joining the City the Capital and Infrastructure budget has steadily increased from $800M to over $3 Billion. She serves as program and grant administrator for the FEMA Public Assistance, FEMA Hazard Mitigation Grant Program, HUD Disaster Community Development Block Grant, and HUD National Disaster Resilience projects. She has assisted in the planning and execution for repairs, renovations, and new construction of over 136 recreational facility projects and she is currently spearheading the Stormwater Management Capital Program.

  • Wildlife Management in a Public Park Setting: Managing the Sometimes Unmanageable

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered

    Wildlife vs. human interactions is a growing concern for liability and health officials. Participants will be exposed to the process toward developing a workable solution for mitigating wildlife issues within their parks.

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    Wildlife vs. human interactions is a growing concern for liability and health officials. Participants will be exposed to the process toward developing a workable solution for mitigating wildlife issues within their parks. Specific case studies will be presented on Canada goose overpopulation and vulture-roosting management plans. Included in this presentation will be specific strategies for establishing cooperative agreements, partnerships and permits necessary for sustainable management plans.

    Session outcomes:

    • Attendees will learn to discover the root of the issue, mitigate concerns, and develop a sustainable solution towards management providing positive recreational value without eroding the ecosystem.
      Attendees will be provided the legal and ethical issues that surround sound wildlife management practices. Necessary partnerships with wildlife agencies will be discussed.
      Attendees will be provided with an understanding of what is sustainable conservation practices and avoiding the quick fix mentality often requested from both the public and elected officials.
  • "Get Your Play On" NRPA 2017 Conference Speed Sessions

    Contains 9 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/27/2017

    This product includes three of the education speed sessions from the NRPA 2017 Annual Conference. Included in this bundle are: "Learning to Create 60,480 New Games in Minutes, "The Universal Language of Play," and "Joyful Play the Results Driven Way"

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    This product includes three of the education speed sessions from the NRPA 2017 Annual Conference. Included in this bundle are: 

    1. Learning to Create 60,480 New Games in Minutes: How about a game that creates a game? Huh? Yep!  It's pretty common that child's "play" is in fact their "work." Kids are creative; at least, they can be if they set the iPad down for a few. Learn first hand how you have immediate access to 60,480 unique games. Modified from the original New Games Foundation's "Invent-A-Game," the PlayMaker Games Grid is VERY user friendly. Let's put our youth to WORK and get the creative juices flowing. It's time to get kids "back2basicplay."
    2. The Universal Language of Play: Play is our first universal language. From our earliest days, play is the practice to develop the basic skills of social interaction. While play is intuitive, that doesn’t mean that making great play environments is easy. Every child is different and what appeals to one doesn’t appeal to another. There are four distinct play styles of play and each is essential for the healthy development of children; they enable them to practice the skills which will make them successful individuals.
    3. Joyful Play the Results Driven Way: Many agencies put objectives in “SMART” format (specific, measurable, achievable, realistic and timed) to assure that objectives are measurable and they use logic modeling to focus their objectives on outcomes and impacts” (CAPRA Standards Chapter 6.0, 5th Edition). This session will provide participants the opportunity to reassemble prepopulated logic models to increase their awareness and knowledge of the value of using logic models to produce joyful play in a result driven way.

    John LaRue, CTRS

    President/Founder, Back2BasicPlay, Inc.

    John LaRue is President/Founder of Back2BasicPlay, Inc, - cooperative-based play instructor – He holds a Bachelor’s and a Master’s degree in Recreation (Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist). He is also a Certified Playground Safety Inspector, as well as a Contributing Writer to More New Games (1981), Games and Great Ideas (1995) and holds the copyright to The Games Generator™ kit (2002). John is a recognized speaker on a national, regional and statewide level on a variety of topics and has presented well over 500 seminars throughout North America, addressing Character in Youth, New Games, Team Building, and Developmental Aspects of Children and Play. 

    Ryan Snyder

    Creative Design & Development Manager, WhiteWater

    Raised in a family of artists and artisans, and formally trained as a design/build architect, Ryan is a versatile and creative professional, experienced in storytelling, architecture/planning, branding, lighting, themed entertainment, resorts, product development, manufacturing, and construction. Combining a child’s-eye perspective with practicality, his favorite questions are “why?” and “why not?”

    With nearly two decades in the aquatics industry, Ryan has worked on a myriad of unique and interesting projects, some of his recent clients include Camelback Resort Lodge and Aquatopia Indoor Waterpark, Disney Resorts, Six Flags, Warner Bros., and the Beijing Olympics. Ryan currently serves as WhiteWater’s Creative Design and Development Manager.

    Sharia Shanklin, Ed.D

    Founder & President, Sustained Learning Solutions, LLC

    Dr. Sharia L. Shanklin published, Professional Learning Communities, People Leading Change (2009), has over 35 years of leadership experience in education and recreation. 

    • Executed Outcome Based Programs Professional Development, Seattle Department of Parks and Recreation 
    • Created Developmental Framework for Outcome Based Programs, District of Columbia Department of Parks and Recreation 
    • Initiated use of Logic Models to design Outcome Based Programs, District of Columbia Department of Parks and Recreation 
    • Key Member of the District of Columbia Department of Parks and Recreation CAPRA Accreditation Committee 
    • Established qualitative and quantitative program evaluation process, District of Columbia Department of Parks and Recreation 

  • Making Creativity Part of Your DNA

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/27/2017

    You’ve been asked to lead an upcoming event that's been taking place for 10 years. You're directed to make sure it is fresh and creative. Where do you begin? This session will leave you inspired with new strategies, approaches and examples that help ensure your work stands out from the pack. The techniques included can help in any situation from event planning, to making a presentation, to inspiring your team. We all have a creative streak – this session will help you uncover or grow yours!

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    You’ve been asked to lead an upcoming event that's been taking place for 10 years. You're directed to make sure it is fresh and creative. Where do you begin? This session will leave you inspired with new strategies, approaches and examples that help ensure your work stands out from the pack. The techniques included can help in any situation from event planning, to making a presentation, to inspiring your team. We all have a creative streak – this session will help you uncover or grow yours!

    It's easy to stick with what works. Garnering attention today, however, means finding new solutions and creative approaches. We all have a creative streak - it just takes making the time to help bring out new ideas and understanding that if you're not making a few mistakes, you're not being creative enough. This session will share examples of creativity in parks & rec, explore approaches and techniques and include a group exercise that lets participants identify zany and effective ideas.

    Competencies: 

    • Define why creativity is important to the bottom line for your organization;
    • Practice using five ways to find creative solutions to any problem or challenge; and
    • Identify trends outside of work that can enhance creativity and build connections with diverse audiences.
  • Designing and Implementing Evidence-Based, Family-Based Programming for Health

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/27/2017

    Come experience the future of supporting health in communities through parks and recreation. We will demonstrate an evidence- and family-based program that has been proven to reduce childhood obesity. We will discuss strategies to advance health in your community by addressing program design, implementation, assessment, sustainability, and how to work with partners. This is an innovative approach that creates programming for parents and preschool children at the same time.

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    Come experience the future of supporting health in communities through parks and recreation. We will demonstrate an evidence- and family-based program that has been proven to reduce childhood obesity. We will discuss strategies to advance health in your community by addressing program design, implementation, assessment, sustainability, and how to work with partners. This is an innovative approach that creates programming for parents and preschool children at the same time.

    Parks and Recreation Departments are a powerful force for improving community health and addressing the childhood obesity epidemic. This session will provide additional training and experience to implement evidence-based programs with sustainable health impact. In this session we will describe how four Parks and Recreation Centers across the country adopted the Healthier Families Program. We will focus on key lessons for new programs to maximize health in the community.

    Competencies:

    • To outline the advantages and challenges in implementing an evidence-based family-centered program for health and wellness in your own local Parks and Recreation context;
    • To identify the organizational resources necessary to implement evidence-based programs that promote health and wellness of both adults and preschool children; and
    • To describe how organizational leadership, community assessment, staff development, and sustainable partnership building were required for national implementation of The Healthier Families Program.
  • Conservation Partnerships for Parks & Recreation

    Contains 5 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.

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    A core mission of public park agencies is to acquire land for parks or conservation areas and to protect local natural resources. America’s open space is disappearing at a rate of 6,000 acres per day. The Trust for Public Land and other conservation driven non-profit organizations, in partnership with local parks and recreation agencies, can change this trend. Understanding conservation partnership examples and best practices can be helpful to park and recreation agencies across the country. The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.

    Session outcomes:

    • Participants will be able to identify strategies to promote collaboration with non-profit, community service organizations for conservation outcomes with proven economic benefits for the community.
    • Participants will be able to identify the strategies and steps needed to acquire, protect, program and manage public lands for conservation purposes.
    • Participants will be able to discuss how conservation non-profit organizations such as The Trust for Public Land collaborate with community park agencies to achieve success.

    James Garges, CPRP

    Director, Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department

    James R. Garges is the Director of the Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department. Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation is the largest department in North Carolina with over 480 employees, over 22,000 acres of park land and an operating budget of $33 million. The Department was selected for the National Park and Recreation Gold Medal Award as the top department in the country with a population of over 250,000 residents. He formerly was Director of the Cincinnati Recreation Commission- Cincinnati, Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Park Administration and Master of Science in Recreation Park Administration from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He has spoken at numerous NRPA Congress sessions.

    Kent Whitehead

    Senior Project Manager and Director, Chesapeake and Carolinas Office, The Trust for Public Land

    Kent serves as a Senior Project Manager for Land Protection and Director of the Trust for Public Land’s Chesapeake and Carolinas Office. With nearly 20 years of experience in land conservation, he has completed over thirty conservation transactions in nine states. Currently he oversees Trust for Public Land projects and programs in the Chesapeake Bay area and the Carolinas, and assists with real estate transactions in other states. He holds a master's degree in City Planning and has education and experience in Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development. Kent lives in Washington, DC.

    Michael Hecker, CPRP

    Parks and Recreation Director, City of Elk River

    Michael Hecker became the City of Elk River’s second full time Parks and Recreation Director when he was hired in October 2011. Prior to coming to Elk River, Mr. Hecker served the City of Mason Ohio as their Parks and Recreation Director for eleven years. Mr. Hecker also worked as the Parks, Culture and Recreation Director for the City of Unalaska, Alaska from 1996 through 2000. He received his Bachelor of Science in Operations Management from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and Master of Science in Recreation Administration from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Michael was recently a speaker at the NRPA Congress in St. Louis and has been a regular presenter for past NRPA Congress sessions and MRPA state conferences.

  • Using Health Data to Power Results

    Contains 5 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    In the mighty age of data, using health data can be a powerful tool to fuel your funding requests, report program results, and demonstrate how your facilities and programs play a vital role in the health of the community. In this session, you will be introduced to how and where to mine data sources to leverage support of your programs.

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    The US is facing an epic health crisis with rising healthcare costs and decreased quality of life. Upstream solutions are needed and parks and recreation providers are uniquely positioned to play a key role. Increasingly, we are being asked to justify our budgets while increasing our responsibilities, which now include being a community health provider. Understanding how our profession interfaces with healthcare begins with understanding key demographic and health data. In the mighty age of data, using health data can be a powerful tool to fuel your funding requests, report program results, and demonstrate how your facilities and programs play a vital role in the health of the community. We can learn how to utilize data to build relationships with healthcare providers using collective impact to grow funding opportunities and improve community health. In this session, you will be introduced to how and where to mine data sources to leverage support of your programs.

    Session Outcomes: 

    • Participants will be able to identify new funding and justification strategies for recreation programs.
    • Participants will be able to access and identify multiple local demographic and health data sets.
    • Participants will be able to utilize data sets to help design better programs, select evidence-based programs, seek new funding sources, and better report program results.

    George Kosovich, MUP

    Assistant Superintendent, Verdant Health Commission

    George Kosovich is the Assistant Superintendent for the Verdant Health Commission/ Public Hospital District No 2, Snohomish County. At Verdant, George’s role is to lead the organization’s program and community investment activities, including grants for health and wellness programs in South Snohomish County. Previously, George worked at the United Way of Snohomish County as a Director of Community Investment. He has also worked in South Los Angeles developing non-profit community and economic development programs. George has a master's degree in urban planning from UCLA and earned his undergraduate degree in finance. George is frequently asked to present at local conferences including the 2016 WRPA Annual Conference.

  • How to Handle a Parks & Recreation PR Communications Crisis

    Contains 5 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    Through real-world examples, Steve will demonstrate best practices on how to successfully handle a public relations crisis in your department to preserve your reputation in the community.

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    Parks and recreation departments are often faced with public relations crises. Any crisis can turn into a potential public relations disaster. The universal factor governing all crises is that they all require detailed and continually updated preparation and practice. A crisis is any event that causes people to have to react to a situation. It can be acute or chronic, good or bad. How it is handled in the media can have a tremendous impact, either positive or negative, on their organization. These are significant unexpected or unwanted events or issues that threaten to harm the organization's brand, reputation and/or its employees, customers, clients and other key audiences and stakeholders. Through real-world examples, Steve will demonstrate best practices on how to successfully handle a public relations crisis in your department to preserve your reputation in the community.

    This session, will: 

    • Analyze how to handle a public relations crisis in their departments. Participants will be given real-world examples of PR crises and given the opportunity to determine how they could respond. 
    • Discuss effective strategies to cope with a public relations crisis in their departments.
    • Prepare participants for a public relations crisis by giving them a plan they can implement at their own cities and counties.

    Steve Stoler

    Director of Media Relations, City of Plano, TX

    Steve is a 34 year veteran of Broadcast Journalism and has served as the City of Plano's Director of Media Relations for 3 years. He worked at seven different television stations in Georgia, Nebraska, North Carolina and Texas. With his vast experience working as a member of the news media, and now, working in municipal government, Steve has a unique perspective on communications that few people have. Steve recently designed two crisis communications plans for the City, one for disasters and other emergencies and the other for public relations crises. Steve also conducts a myriad of media training classes for City employees and statewide organizations.

  • How to Portray the Value of Trails in Your Community

    Contains 4 Component(s), 0.1 credits offered Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    ​This workshop will provide tangible strategies and implementation tools to leverage trails to create real-estate value and promote city building. We will also explore methodologies for design and placemaking that can create experiences and destinations, leverage public and private interests, align the trail to be a social-equity tool, and realize safe and accessible design with low environmental impact.​

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    This workshop will provide tangible strategies and implementation tools to leverage trails to create real-estate value and promote city building. We will also explore methodologies for design and placemaking that can create experiences and destinations, leverage public and private interests, align the trail to be a social-equity tool, and realize safe and accessible design with low environmental impact. 

    Urban trails can nurture wide-ranging benefits, from tourism and increased land value, to increased economic competitiveness and more socially equitable placemaking. In fact, trails are the open space typology with the most potential for value creation in a city. The challenge tends to be that city leaders do not always understand the value creation potential of well-designed trails, and with less municipal and state funds, it is increasingly necessary to be able to make the case for trail value.

    Competencies:

    • Upon completion of this session, participants will have an understanding of how Cities can leverage trails for economic competitiveness;
    • Participants will come away with the beginnings of a mechanism for how to communicate the case for trail development in their city by being able to show the range of benefits that can be unlocked; and
    • Participants will learn best practices in trail design for achieving safe and accessible pedestrian and bicycle networks that will contribute to the social equity of the city.