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  • Partnering with Land Trusts

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learn how park and recreation agencies and land trusts are working together to protect land, engage their community, and ensure that local conservation goals reflect the needs and culture of a diverse public.

    imageLearn how park and recreation agencies and land trusts are working together to protect land, engage their community, and ensure that local conservation goals reflect the needs and culture of a diverse public. During the session participants will hear from the Land Trust Alliance's Director of Community Conservation on the valuable role that land trusts can play in helping to meet park equity goals. Taos Land Trust will share lessons learned from their current effort to create a new community park that will provide opportunities for cultural education and recreation, restore a critical floodplain property, and bring together diverse populations from within the Taos community.

    Kristina Ortez

    Executive Director, Taos Land Trust

    Kristina grew up in the San Joaquin Valley of California. She graduated from Harvard College with a degree in Anthropology, and began her career in New York City working in marketing and editing. In the late 90s, Kristina and friends started an internet company whose demise is forever immortalized on digital film in “Startup.com.” Shortly after the internet boom, Kristina moved to Indonesia, where she worked as an editor at Lontar Foundation, a literary foundation in Jakarta. It was here that her environmental consciousness was born after witnessing the devastating effects of environmental degradation. Kristina came back to the States determined to work on environmental issues that affected her own community. She has been an organizer, advocate and a policy analyst on public lands and water issues and served as a board member of organizations to restore and protect the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta and the San Joaquin River. She is the current vice chair of Conservation Voters New Mexico. 

    Lori Robertson

    Director of Conservation, National Recreation and Park Association

    As Director of Conservation at the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) Lori Robertson provides strategic direction and fundraising oversight for NRPA’s conservation portfolio. With background as a science educator in both public school and residential outdoor programs, Lori has spent her career working to connect young people with the natural world. She comes to NRPA from the Student Conservation Association where she led SCA’s national engagement strategy and created programs focused on providing urban residents with service, learning, and recreation opportunities on public lands. She is a graduate of the 2016 American Express Nonprofit Leadership Academy, a current student at Georgetown University and mom to 3 year old River.

    Rob Aldrich

    Director of Community Conservation, Land Trust Alliance

    Rob Aldrich is director of community conservation at the Land Trust Alliance, a program designed to bring more conservation to more people. Previously, Rob was the Alliance’s director of communications, and before that the director of information services. Before joining the Alliance in 2000, Rob worked for a private consulting firm on contract to the USAID Global Environment Center, and for the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service backstopping development projects for USAID. He was a Peace Corps Volunteer in Guatemala. Rob speaks Spanish and has a B.S. in plant and soil science and an M.S. in urban planning and the environment. 


  • So, I’ve been appointed the new ADA Coordinator

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    From program access and reasonable modifications, to direct threat and undue burden, this session is going to roll ADA compliance into a nutshell for you.

    imageNo kid ever said “I want to be an ADA Coordinator when I grow up.” So now that #28 on your job description “other duties as assigned” translates to ADA Coordinator, what do you need to know? Have no fear. From program access and reasonable modifications, to direct threat and undue burden, this session is going to roll ADA compliance into a nutshell for you. Jennifer Skulski has more than 25-years experience in ADA compliance and inclusion of people with disabilities in parks, recreation and tourism. She will frame an approach to put your accessibility management team on track and make people with disabilities feel more welcome in your programs, activities, parks and facilities.

    Jennifer Skulski

    Principal, Skulski Consulting, LLC.

    Jennifer Skulski has more than 22-years experience consulting on ADA compliance and inclusion of people with disabilities. She is a national leading expert on the accessibility standards for parks and recreation, program access, and universal design. Jennifer has facilitated ADA transition planning for more than 500 municipal recreation facilities and 60 national parks. She has consulted with organizations such as the National Park Service, Minneapolis Parks and Recreation, Great Parks of Hamilton County, Cleveland Metroparks, and the Arlington Heights Park District. She has authored numerous articles on accessibility management and inclusion. In addition to consultation, Jennifer is the publisher of Accessibility Management News.

  • Intentional Mentoring - Learning and Connecting for Professional Evolution

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    ​Moving forward professionally requires evolving in your knowledge, skills, competencies, and connections. Having good mentors in your life helps support and target your growth. Learning how to best be a mentor later in life helps you give back and leave a strong legacy. This session covers what you need to know to do all of this.​

    imageMoving forward professionally requires evolving in your knowledge, skills, competencies, and connections. Having good mentors in your life helps support and target your growth. Learning how to best be a mentor later in life helps you give back and leave a strong legacy. This session covers what you need to know to do all of this.

    Dr. Teresa Penbrooke, CPRE

    CEO, Researcher, and Faculty, GP RED, GreenPlay, and NCSU

    Dr. Teresa Penbrooke, founded GreenPlay LLC in 1999, is faculty for GP RED, and Visiting Scholar for NCSU. Teresa has 25+ years of practice and research experience in implementation improvements for administration, healthy communities, and parks and recreation planning for universities, associations, individuals, and agencies.

  • From Orientation to Onboarding: Making the Most of the First 90 Days

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In today’s fast-paced world, getting new talent started in their job as quickly as possible is important for the health of your business. However, a new job can be overwhelming, and by creating a welcoming environment, building cultural buy-in, and sharing tribal knowledge, you not only improve the chances of new hire success but create loyalty and have a little fun!

    imageIn today’s fast-paced world, getting new talent started in their job as quickly as possible is important for the health of your business. However, a new job can be overwhelming, and by creating a welcoming environment, building cultural buy-in, and sharing tribal knowledge, you not only improve the chances of new hire success but create loyalty and have a little fun!

    Kristen Barnes

    Trainer & Consultant, Five Star Recreation

    Kirsten's career has included supervising programs such as youth sports, summer camps, seniors, ice arenas, golf courses, and more. Kirsten also oversaw lifeguard management at 24 aquatic facilities and waterparks with a private management company, & she worked in private fitness and wellness serving over 17,000 members, supervising over 220 employees, and overseeing a budget of almost $10M in annual revenues. She currently works with agencies to provide customized professional development and frontline training. Kirsten has also spoken at educational conferences around the country, has spoken at NRPA Annual Conference & National Aquatic Conference, and was a faculty member of National Aquatic Management School.

  • NRPA Live 2018 Speed Sessions Volume 2

    Contains 8 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This product includes 3 speed sessions recorded from the NRPA 2018 Annual Conference: Fantastic Female Recreation Leaders and Where to Find Them; The Public's Health Agency: Parks and Recreation's Critical Role in Communities; and Unlock your Fundraising Future: 10 Rules for Attracting - and Sustaining - Donors to your Mission

    imageThis product includes 3 speed sessions recorded from the NRPA 2018 Annual Conference:

    Fantastic Female Recreation Leaders and Where to Find Them

    Female contributions to recreation, parks and open space in our country are far-reaching and often underrepresented in the national conversation about the future of our parks and recreation spaces. This session will highlight women who have influenced land conservation, social equity, and health and wellness in our communities, like Dorothy Enderis, who in the early 20th century advocated for leisure as a necessary element of mental and physical well-being and Cora Masters Barry who founded Recreation Wish List which geared towards teaching urban youth how to play tennis and engage them in team sports. The session is meant to provoke meaningful discussion that highlights strong females devoted to positive impact on their communities.

    Engage the Silent Voices

    As stewards of community resources, charged with providing services to all residents, we ask: What segments of your community have “silent voices”? Does your entire community feel the services are fair and equitable, and that you’re meeting their needs? Who are you not serving, and how do you know you’re not serving them? Explore some ‘pulse strategies’ and create a plan that helps you listen to and engage with the diverse perspectives in your community.

    Unlock your Fundraising Future: 10 Rules for Attracting - and Sustaining - Donors to your Mission

    In a time of ever-shrinking budgets, many public agencies are considering how they can tap into America's culture of philanthropy to diversify revenue and achieve their mission. From partnering with external "friends" groups, to hiring professional fundraising staff, to establishing a 501c3 supporting organization, there are many models for turning your users into life-long donors, advocates, and ambassadors for your mission. But which is right for you? And what messages inspire people to give beyond their tax dollars? This session will present 10 rules for establishing - and growing - a vibrant donor community to take your agency to the next level.

    Dannielle Wilson

    Consultant, DW Recreation Consulting

    A practitioner and consultant in the recreation industry, Dannielle brings strong analytical skills and innovative strategic thinking to clients nationwide. She offers a fresh approach and real-world solutions, with a constant focus on revenue management, process improvement, and a philosophy of customer-centric decision making. Email Dannielle: Dannie@DWRecreationConsulting.com.

    Rebekah Snyder

    Chief Development Officer, Lake County Forest Preserve District

    Rebekah Snyder is chief development officer of the Lake County Forest Preserve District and executive director of the Preservation Foundation, an independent 501c3 charity with a mission to extend and accelerate the Forest Preserves impact. In this capacity, she is responsible for all aspects of raising charitable support from individuals, foundations, corporations, and government agencies, including board and committee management, budget and program development, the Annual Fund, grant-writing, capital campaigns, and major and planned giving. Rebekah is a member of the District’s senior management team, reporting to the Lake County Forest Preserves Board of Commissioners and the Board of Directors of the Preservation Foundation.

    Prior to joining the District, Rebekah was associate director of development for the Illinois Chapter of The Nature Conservancy and senior development officer at the Chicago Botanic Garden. She has a bachelor’s degree in environmental science from Northwestern University and a master’s degree in environmental studies from Yale University. 

    Rhiannon Sinclair

    Urban Planner, Agency Landscape + Planning

    Rhiannon is an urban planner with Agency Landscape and Planning, a women-run business which works with diverse and innovative public organizations across the country. She has considerable experience communicating communicating information to broad audiences to promote strong community exchange and empowerment within a planning process. She has worked with many driven women leaders in the recreation field, including Howard County, Maryland and Greensboro, North Carolina. She helped facilitate the NRPA Innovation Lab in Boston and will speak on the topic of diversity at the National ASLA conference in October 2018. Rhiannon has a bachelor degree in architecture from Philadelphia University and a master degree in city and regional planning from the University of Pennsylvania. 

  • Advocacy by design: Innovations in parks and public places for building diverse constituencies

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Experts from five cities working on the ground will share how the Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative is demonstrating that innovative, meaningful engagement can result in public places that serve us all—and that yield greater advocacy, stewardship, equity and even funding.

    imageIn five cities, civic leaders and parks professionals are collaborating with local communities to reinvigorate civic assets in a way that attracts a wide range of people—and cultivates long-term advocacy for parks and public places among diverse constituencies. This session explores ongoing efforts in Akron, Chicago, Detroit, Memphis and Philadelphia to reinvent how cities and local organizations engage people in improving, programming and maintaining civic assets. Experts working on the ground in the cities will share how the Reimagining the Civic Commons initiative is demonstrating that innovative, meaningful engagement can result in public places that serve us all—and that yield greater advocacy, stewardship, equity and even funding.

    Alexa Brush

    Landscape Architect and Planner, City of Detroit

    Carol Coletta

    Senior Fellow, Kresge Foundation American Cities Practice

    Carol Coletta is president and CEO of the Memphis River Parks Partnership. She is leading the relaunch of a nonprofit to develop, manage and program six miles of riverfront and five park districts along the Mississippi River.

    She is on loan from The Kresge Foundation where she is a senior fellow in the foundation’s American Cities Practice.  She leads a $50+ million collaboration of national and local foundations, local nonprofits and governments to Reimagine the Civic Commons in five cities.  It is planned as the first comprehensive demonstration of how a connected set of civic assets – a civic commons – can yield increased and more widely share prosperity for cities and neighborhoods.  

    Demetrius Lambert-Falconer

    Outreach Manager, Summit Metro Parks

    Gia Biagi

    Principal of Urbanism and Civic Impact, Studio Gang

    Gia Biagi is a Principal at Studio Gang, an architecture and urban design collective located in Chicago, New York, and San Francisco.  Gia is widely regarded as a thought leader around issues related to cities and public space and guides the Studio’s urbanism and civic impact work.

    At Studio Gang, she leads design teams, coordinates master plans, facilitates community engagement, and directs the urban design approach for projects across the United States.  Prior to joining Studio Gang, Gia spent sixteen years working for the City of Chicago, including posts at the Park District as Director of Planning, Director of Strategy and Policy, and Chief of Staff.  Gia also serves as President of NeighborSpace, a non-profit land trust that provides community-based management and long-term protection to over 100 urban gardens in neighborhoods across Chicago.  

    Kathryn Ott Lovell

    Commissioner, Philadelphia Parks & Recreation

    Kathryn Ott Lovell serves as the Commissioner of Philadelphia Parks and Recreation where she leads more than 700 employees and oversees the city’s parkland, playgrounds, recreation centers, trails and thousands of programs and events. She is credited with the recent “Reimagining the Civic Commons” initiative, a program underway to re-imagine the city’s vast and beloved parks as destinations where residents can gather and connect with their community in a meaningful way.

     Under Commissioner Ott Lovell’s leadership, the Philadelphia Parks and Recreation Department will experience a drastic transformation over the next eight years through the city’s “Rebuilding Community Infrastructure” project, otherwise referred to as “Rebuild.” The Rebuild project is a massive effort to invest nearly half a billion dollars over the next six years to improve the city’s civic assets. As a private- and public-funded venture, the project intends to use the city’s public spaces as a way to promote social connectivity, elevate community engagement, and bring equity to some of the city’s most underserved neighborhoods.

    Ms. Ott Lovell currently serves on the boards of the Free Library of Philadelphia, Please Touch Museum, the Schuylkill River Development Corporation and the Philadelphia Sports Congress. She lives in West Philadelphia with her husband, Andrew, and two daughters, Lucy and Johanna. 

  • How to Raise Prices without Making Users Mad

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The session will apply behavioral economic principles to the pricing of park and recreation services. The essential concepts of adaptation level theory, assimilation-contrast theory, reference price theory, and prospect theory which provide the framework for these principles will be explained.

    imageThe session will apply behavioral economic principles to the pricing of park and recreation services. The essential concepts of adaptation level theory, assimilation-contrast theory, reference price theory, and prospect theory which provide the framework for these principles will be explained. To reconcile inconsistencies with reference price, five strategies are available; the effectiveness of providing quality in cost information to accomplish this will be described; and eight strategies informed by prospect theory will be developed. These heuristics are the tools managers have to remove any angst that is likely to emerge in response to price increases.

    John Crompton

    Distinguished Professor & Mayor Pro Tem, City of College Station

    Biographical Profile

  • Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Health(iness): All parks are NOT created equal

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Parks are such good medicine that doctors are now prescribing visits to them as treatment for a variety of ailments. But not all parks are the same, so how do we know how good the medicine is for a particular park? This session will show how the “medicinal value” of one park can be measured and compared to another.

    imageParks are such good medicine that doctors are now prescribing visits to them as treatment for a variety of ailments. But not all parks are the same, so how do we know how good the medicine is for a particular park? This session will show how the “medicinal value” of one park can be measured and compared to another. While the process is rooted in scientific evidence, this presentation will focus on its practical use in planning, designing, and promoting parks as public health amenities, including how the measure of each park’s potential to generate healthy physical activity can be combined with demographic data to evaluate the overall performance of a park system for providing equitable access to healthy activity for all residents.

    Rod Tarullo, CPRE

    Director of Parks and Recreation City of Golden

    Rod Tarullo, is the Director of Park, Recreation and Golf at the City of Golden, Colorado. As Director of Golden's park system, Rod Tarullo was responsible for guiding Golden's new parks and recreation master plan and assuring that it met the city council's stated goal of making public health a focus of the plan.  Using new metrics to measure the public health potential provided by their parks, the master plan is a unique document, guiding Golden's decisions on park amenities and future designs.

    Roby Layton, PhD, FASLA, CPRP

    Principal / Executive Director/ Assitant Teaching Professor; Design Concepts / GP RED / NCSU

    After years of designing award-winning parks, Robby earned his PhD researching what really makes people appreciate and use them. For his dissertation he looked specifically at what it is about parks that encourages people to visit them more often and feel that their needs are being met. He has now translated this research into useful information for park professionals looking to improve the lives of their citizens by getting them engaged in healthy activity outdoors. Since completing his PhD in 2016, he has applied what he learned to the development of new metrics and standards and applied these on park master plans, strategic plans, and public health projects. His innovative techniques and practices are in use by agencies nationwide.

  • The Art of Gaining Consensus & Getting Things Done

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Learn how to proactively weave the fundamental steps for consensus-building into your projects in order to avoid many of these challenges in the first place, as well as how to respond to resistance and conflict when it inevitably happens.​

    imageAs our country and communities become more divided, getting people on board and working together is becoming an increasingly tough challenge. No matter whether it is concerning a new project, policy, park, or program you’re working on, helping groups come together and getting support for your initiatives is a skill that every professional must learn in order to get things done. Learn how to proactively weave the fundamental steps for consensus-building into your projects in order to avoid many of these challenges in the first place, as well as how to respond to resistance and conflict when it inevitably happens.

    Bobbi Nance

    President, Recreation Results

    Bobbi Nance is the founder of Recreation Results where she helps teams find value in their data, capitalize on trends, implement strategy, and push innovative thinking to increase their impact in the communities where they work. Bobbi's presented hundreds of workshops across North America all focused on breaking down complex topics and sharing practical approaches to putting them to use.

  • More Design Glitches & Building Blunders

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Drawing from the experience of over 220 projects built over the last 30 years, this session uncovers even more of the top lessons learned shared by community leaders, operators, contractors and designers.

    imageHindsight is 20/20. “What would you do differently?” is the question owners should be asking prior to planning and building a new community recreation center. Drawing from the experience of over 220 projects built over the last 30 years, this session uncovers even more of the top lessons learned shared by community leaders, operators, contractors and designers.

    Craig Bouck, AIA, LEED AP

    CEO, Principal, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture

    Craig is a frequent speaker and author in the recreation design industry. For the past two decades, he has worked with recreation professionals to design value-driven projects that solve problems, create opportunities and build community. Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture has been involved in more than 200 community recreation projects across the country, providing feasibility studies, conceptual designs and award-winning architectural and interior design services.

    Mick Massey, RLA

    Texas Regional Director, Barker Rinker Seacat Architecture

    Mick’s 29 years of experience in municipal government is value added to any community project. His experience as a former Parks and Recreation Director drives his passion for professionals and agencies to “plan your work, and work your plan,” especially when it comes to recreation center planning. Mick’s enthusiasm for public projects is contagious and his knowledge of local government is extremely helpful. He is a registered landscape architect, park planner, and a master at building public consensus.