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Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
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  • Conservation Partnerships for Parks & Recreation

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.

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    A core mission of public park agencies is to acquire land for parks or conservation areas and to protect local natural resources. America’s open space is disappearing at a rate of 6,000 acres per day. The Trust for Public Land and other conservation driven non-profit organizations, in partnership with local parks and recreation agencies, can change this trend. Understanding conservation partnership examples and best practices can be helpful to park and recreation agencies across the country. The conservation mission has become increasingly important as it promotes individual, social and environmental health within our communities. This session will describe how the greatest conservation successes occur in collaboration with nonprofit partners. We will review two case study and best practice examples.

    Session outcomes:

    • Participants will be able to identify strategies to promote collaboration with non-profit, community service organizations for conservation outcomes with proven economic benefits for the community.
    • Participants will be able to identify the strategies and steps needed to acquire, protect, program and manage public lands for conservation purposes.
    • Participants will be able to discuss how conservation non-profit organizations such as The Trust for Public Land collaborate with community park agencies to achieve success.

    James Garges, CPRP

    Director, Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department

    James R. Garges is the Director of the Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation Department. Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation is the largest department in North Carolina with over 480 employees, over 22,000 acres of park land and an operating budget of $33 million. The Department was selected for the National Park and Recreation Gold Medal Award as the top department in the country with a population of over 250,000 residents. He formerly was Director of the Cincinnati Recreation Commission- Cincinnati, Ohio. He received his Bachelor of Science in Recreation and Park Administration and Master of Science in Recreation Park Administration from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. He has spoken at numerous NRPA Congress sessions.

    Kent Whitehead

    Senior Project Manager and Director, Chesapeake and Carolinas Office, The Trust for Public Land

    Kent serves as a Senior Project Manager for Land Protection and Director of the Trust for Public Land’s Chesapeake and Carolinas Office. With nearly 20 years of experience in land conservation, he has completed over thirty conservation transactions in nine states. Currently he oversees Trust for Public Land projects and programs in the Chesapeake Bay area and the Carolinas, and assists with real estate transactions in other states. He holds a master's degree in City Planning and has education and experience in Historic Preservation and Real Estate Development. Kent lives in Washington, DC.

    Michael Hecker, CPRP

    Parks and Recreation Director, City of Elk River

    Michael Hecker became the City of Elk River’s second full time Parks and Recreation Director when he was hired in October 2011. Prior to coming to Elk River, Mr. Hecker served the City of Mason Ohio as their Parks and Recreation Director for eleven years. Mr. Hecker also worked as the Parks, Culture and Recreation Director for the City of Unalaska, Alaska from 1996 through 2000. He received his Bachelor of Science in Operations Management from Brigham Young University in Provo, Utah and Master of Science in Recreation Administration from Indiana University in Bloomington, Indiana. Michael was recently a speaker at the NRPA Congress in St. Louis and has been a regular presenter for past NRPA Congress sessions and MRPA state conferences.

  • Using Health Data to Power Results

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    In the mighty age of data, using health data can be a powerful tool to fuel your funding requests, report program results, and demonstrate how your facilities and programs play a vital role in the health of the community. In this session, you will be introduced to how and where to mine data sources to leverage support of your programs.

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    The US is facing an epic health crisis with rising healthcare costs and decreased quality of life. Upstream solutions are needed and parks and recreation providers are uniquely positioned to play a key role. Increasingly, we are being asked to justify our budgets while increasing our responsibilities, which now include being a community health provider. Understanding how our profession interfaces with healthcare begins with understanding key demographic and health data. In the mighty age of data, using health data can be a powerful tool to fuel your funding requests, report program results, and demonstrate how your facilities and programs play a vital role in the health of the community. We can learn how to utilize data to build relationships with healthcare providers using collective impact to grow funding opportunities and improve community health. In this session, you will be introduced to how and where to mine data sources to leverage support of your programs.

    Session Outcomes: 

    • Participants will be able to identify new funding and justification strategies for recreation programs.
    • Participants will be able to access and identify multiple local demographic and health data sets.
    • Participants will be able to utilize data sets to help design better programs, select evidence-based programs, seek new funding sources, and better report program results.

    George Kosovich, MUP

    Assistant Superintendent, Verdant Health Commission

    George Kosovich is the Assistant Superintendent for the Verdant Health Commission/ Public Hospital District No 2, Snohomish County. At Verdant, George’s role is to lead the organization’s program and community investment activities, including grants for health and wellness programs in South Snohomish County. Previously, George worked at the United Way of Snohomish County as a Director of Community Investment. He has also worked in South Los Angeles developing non-profit community and economic development programs. George has a master's degree in urban planning from UCLA and earned his undergraduate degree in finance. George is frequently asked to present at local conferences including the 2016 WRPA Annual Conference.

  • How to Portray the Value of Trails in Your Community

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    ​This workshop will provide tangible strategies and implementation tools to leverage trails to create real-estate value and promote city building. We will also explore methodologies for design and placemaking that can create experiences and destinations, leverage public and private interests, align the trail to be a social-equity tool, and realize safe and accessible design with low environmental impact.​

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    This workshop will provide tangible strategies and implementation tools to leverage trails to create real-estate value and promote city building. We will also explore methodologies for design and placemaking that can create experiences and destinations, leverage public and private interests, align the trail to be a social-equity tool, and realize safe and accessible design with low environmental impact. 

    Urban trails can nurture wide-ranging benefits, from tourism and increased land value, to increased economic competitiveness and more socially equitable placemaking. In fact, trails are the open space typology with the most potential for value creation in a city. The challenge tends to be that city leaders do not always understand the value creation potential of well-designed trails, and with less municipal and state funds, it is increasingly necessary to be able to make the case for trail value.

    Competencies:

    • Upon completion of this session, participants will have an understanding of how Cities can leverage trails for economic competitiveness;
    • Participants will come away with the beginnings of a mechanism for how to communicate the case for trail development in their city by being able to show the range of benefits that can be unlocked; and
    • Participants will learn best practices in trail design for achieving safe and accessible pedestrian and bicycle networks that will contribute to the social equity of the city.
  • Build a 21st Century Diverse Workforce and Inclusive Work Environment at Your Agency Today

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    Much like work/life balance, most parks and recreation agencies miss the mark with diversity and inclusion. This work session with facilitated discussion and best and leading practice sharing will leave participants energized and ready to begin a journey to building inclusive language and behaviors into their key daily functions. From tough discussion on diversity to program planning, we will tackle specific ways to move diversity and inclusion initiatives to full integration in your agency.

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    Much like work/life balance, most parks and recreation agencies miss the mark with diversity and inclusion. This work session with facilitated discussion and best and leading practice sharing will leave participants energized and ready to begin a journey to building inclusive language and behaviors into their key daily functions. From tough discussion on diversity to program planning, we will tackle specific ways to move diversity and inclusion initiatives to full integration in your agency.

    Social Equity is one of NRPA’s Three Pillars and this session gets at it from both a workforce development and programming lens while building skills to help practitioners with bias and equipping them with language to begin these tough discussion back home. This session was submitted for 2016 and well received but originally build as 2.25 and deserves that timing as it’s a complex subject matter and if this is a key pillar - NRPA should consider giving it that space. However, we adjusted.

    Competencies:

    • Identify why diversity and a diverse workforce and service offering is imperative; 
    • Develop the emotional fortitude to have difficult discussions around diversity and inclusion; and
    • Implement some initial tools for recognizing and building an inclusive work environment.
  • Inclusive Outreach for Equitable Results: Using a Logic Model for the Get Moving Initiative

    Contains 5 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/26/2017

    This session is a fusion of equity and results-based accountability, with two key themes: (1) inclusive outreach strategies to effectively reach underserved communities, and (2) using performance measurement tools for equitable results. We will profile Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Get Moving Initiative, which used equity goals and a logic model as tools to guide and track inclusive outreach strategies for its community fitness-grant program.

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    This session is a fusion of equity and results-based accountability, with two key themes: (1) inclusive outreach strategies to effectively reach underserved communities, and (2) using performance measurement tools for equitable results. We will profile Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Get Moving Initiative, which used equity goals and a logic model as tools to guide and track inclusive outreach strategies for its community fitness-grant program. 

    As our country grows increasingly diverse, parks and recreation professionals must enhance their toolkits for inclusive outreach and equitable programming. Additionally, public agencies are under increasing pressure to be effective in their work, and to add analytical rigor to their efforts, in the form of results-based accountability. This workshop will provide an example of using one tool for performance measurement (the logic model) to effectively guide inclusive outreach strategies.

    Competencies:

    • Participants will be able to use community-level data to set equity goals;
    • Participants will be able to understand and apply innovative inclusive outreach strategies; and
    • Participants will be able to develop and use a logic model to track performance of outreach strategies.
  • Diversity and Cultural Awareness

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Diversity and cultural awareness explores the importance of developing a diverse, equitable, and ethical workplace. To instill an innovative and progressive workplace, it is important that leaders consider how to instill diversity into the organizational culture.

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    Diversity and cultural awareness explores the importance of developing a diverse, equitable, and ethical workplace. To instill an innovative and progressive workplace, it is important that leaders consider how to instill diversity into the organizational culture. This course will cover the following four areas:

    • Defining culture, diversity, and inclusion; 
    • Designing an inclusive environment for your organization both internally and externally;
    • Managing community outreach; and
    • Creating an ethical organization.

    This product is one component of NRPA's Leadership Certificate Program.

  • CPRP Preparation: Communications

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Communications  Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the communications aspects of park and recreation including: Internal and external communications, and strategic planning for communications.

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    The Communications  Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the communications aspects of park and recreation including: Internal and external communications, and strategic planning for communications. 

    To receive credit for this course you must view the course in its entirety, pass the lesson quiz questions and complete the final exam. CPRP Communications Module access is valid for 6 months from date of purchase. Access is granted to the consumer only as a limited license and grants that user a non-transferable personal license to access and use the online learning center for the CPRP Communications Module and its content for personal, non-commercial use only.

  • CPRP Preparation: Programming

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Programming Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the programming aspects of parks and recreation including: creating and supervising programs, facilitating programs, marketing programs, evaluating participant satisfaction, performing participant assessments, maintaining relationships, developing league schedules, and reporting requirements.

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    The Programming Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the programming aspects of parks and recreation including: creating and supervising programs, facilitating programs, marketing programs, evaluating participant satisfaction, performing participant assessments, maintaining relationships, developing league schedules, and reporting requirements. 

    To receive credit for this course you must view the course in its entirety, pass the lesson quiz questions and complete the final exam. CPRP Programming Module access is valid for 6 months from date of purchase. Access is granted to the consumer only as a limited license and grants that user a non-transferable personal license to access and use the online learning center for the CPRP Programming Module and its content for personal, non-commercial use only.

  • CPRP Preparation: Human Resources

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Human Resource Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the human resource aspects of parks and recreation including: recruiting, reviewing applications, interviewing, supervising, schedule development , and final recommendations

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    The Human Resource Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the human resource aspects of parks and recreation including: recruiting, reviewing applications, interviewing, supervising, schedule development , and final recommendations. 

    To receive credit for this course you must view the course in its entirety, pass the lesson quiz questions and complete the final exam. CPRP Human Resource Module access is valid for 6 months from date of purchase. Access is granted to the consumer only as a limited license and grants that user a non-transferable personal license to access and use the online learning center for the CPRP Human Resource Module and its content for personal, non-commercial use only.

  • CPRP Preparation: Finance

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The Finance Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the financial aspects of parks and recreation including: purchasing, budgeting, alternative funding, cash handling practices, together with the collection of financial and operating data.

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    The Finance Module provides instruction to professionals on many of the financial aspects of parks and recreation including: purchasing, budgeting, alternative funding, cash handling practices, together with the collection of financial and operating data. 

    To receive credit for this course you must view the course in its entirety, pass the lesson quiz questions and complete the final exam. CPRP Finance Module access is valid for 6 months from date of purchase. Access is granted to the consumer only as a limited license and grants that user a non-transferable personal license to access and use the online learning center for the CPRP Finance Module and its content for personal, non-commercial use only.