2020 Climate-Ready Parks Bundle

This bundle is a collection of four, 2020 Virtual sessions with a focus on Climate-Ready Parks. Upon completion, the sessions included in this bundle are eligible for 0.3 CEU. The fourth session is included for no additional cost and eligible for 0.034 CEU.


Sessions included in this bundle:

  1. Assigning Value to the Financial, Environmental and Social Benefits of Nature in Urban Greenspaces (0.1 CEU)
  2. There’s an Octopus in the Parking Garage?! ‘Futureproof’ Your Parks for Resiliency to Climate Change (0.1 CEU)
  3. From Brown to Green: Transforming Urban Infrastructure in Lakeland, Florida (0.1 CEU)
  4. Conservation in the Parks: A Community-Based Approach (0.034 CEU)

NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

  • Conservation in the Parks: A Community-Based Approach

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This 2020 Virtual session outlines the framework for developing impactful conservation-related goals, defining the data needs to develop those goals, and discusses the immense benefits of utilizing citizen-science to engage and build community around environmental issues in local parks and green spaces.

    The effects of urbanization have been demonstrated to be the leading cause of the loss of biodiversity on a global scale. Solutions to preventing the extinction of locally rare species and degradation of imperative ecosystems can be addressed effectively by local park and recreation agencies through strategic natural areas preservation, active stewardship and community engagement throughout the process. Acquiring the necessary data for the long-term conservation of local biodiversity clearly can be a daunting task when staff, time and monetary resources are limited. This session will outline the framework for developing impactful conservation-related goals, defining the data needs to develop those goals, and discuss the immense benefits of utilizing citizen-science to engage and build community around addressing environmental issues in local parks and green spaces.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Utilize community-based monitoring and stewardship initiatives to develop attainable conservation-related goals as a park and recreation organization. 




    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Julia Robson

    Waukesha County Parks and Land Use

    Julia Robson has 10+ of experience working in the natural resource management field. She worked for the Urban Ecology Center and Milwaukee County Parks before coming to Waukesha County in 2018. In 2016 Julia’s community-based wetland monitoring program she developed was awarded the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources “Citizen-based Monitoring Program of the Year” award.

  • From Brown to Green: Transforming Urban Infrastructure in Lakeland, Florida

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual sessionto learn how innovative designs for brownfield sites, partnering, and funding are remediating the land and transforming it into a new Central Park for Florida.

    From a Baygall Swamp to a bustling railyard that served as the largest employer in Central Florida, Lake Bonnet and its surrounding land played a myriad of roles throughout its history. This 180-acre piece of land adjacent to downtown Lakeland, FL was a working piece of infrastructure up until the 1950s. Fast-forward 60 years to today and to the next role of this derelict brownfield site: a public park. Bonnet Springs Park's visionary mission and technical challenge are to reverse the impacts of former Lakeland Rail Yard operations and create a site where wetlands work to manage and clean an urban watershed, artful landforms conceal decades of contamination, and imaginative horticulture encourages a connection to nature for future generations. This session will explore how innovative designs for brownfield sites, partnering, and funding is remediating the land and transforming it into a new Central Park for Florida.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand the organizational structure and funding strategies to design, build, and operate a privately-funded public park.
    2. Explore the phases of design and permitting needed to transform a derelict piece of land into a successful urban park.
    3. Investigate the latest technologies in remediation, water management, and trash collection and how they serve as infrastructure for the larger urban fabric.

     

    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Anna Cawrse

    Landscape Architect

    Sasaki

    Anna is a landscape architect at Sasaki who has worked on and managed complex built projects and park plans across North America. From large regional parks along major waterways, to small pocket parks within the urban fabric of cities, Anna brings an expertise on how to transition master plans of the public realm into realized space. Anna is also an adjunct professor at Northeastern University.

    Bill Tinsley

    President

    Bonnet Springs Park

    Todd Kafka

    Principal Hydrogeologist

    Geosyntec Consultants

  • There’s an Octopus in the Parking Garage?! ‘Futureproof’ Your Parks for Resiliency to Climate Change

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session for an overview of how climate change will be affecting parks and recreation departments, what jurisdictions around the country are doing to be more resilient, and how you can describe these changes and their effects on elected officials and the public.

    With the election upon us, one topic that is often discussed is climate change and its dramatic effects on communities all over the world. Increased flooding, drought, expanding ranges of non-native invasive species, access to clean water, and changes in the growing season are just a few impacts that show that this isn't just a coastal problem. Resiliency is another term often used, but what is resiliency and why should you be thinking about it when developing/redeveloping parks? Making decisions regarding the location of parkland, the use of those lands, the placement of infrastructure, and overall park design will be critical in the coming decades. This discussion will give you a good idea of how climate change will be affecting parks and recreation departments, what jurisdictions around the country are doing to be more resilient, and how you describe these changes and their effects to elected officials and the public.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand how climate change is affecting communities and parklands.
    2. Identify practical steps to "futureproof" parks for long-term sustainability, recreational use, natural resource protection, and climate change mitigation.
    3. Discuss how parklands assist municipalities with resilience.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Chris Matthews

    Division Director

    Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation

    Chris Matthews is the division director for nature preserves and natural resources for Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation in North Carolina. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology and a Master of Science degree in applied ecology and conservation biology. His professional interests include habitat restoration, fisheries, stream restoration and protected species management. Matthews speaks regularly at NRPA Annual Conferences and instructed at the NRPA Green School.

    Jai Cole

    Natural Resources Manager

    Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Montgomery Parks

    Jai Cole has 15 years of experience in Park and Recreation and is currently the Natural Resources Manager for M-NCPPC, Montgomery County Department of Parks. Cole supervises Natural Resources staff in Montgomery Parks who are tasked to manages the stewardship of 457 miles of streams, 26,000 acres of forest and more than 500 lakes, ponds and stormwater management facilities and devices in the 38,000 acre 5 time NRPA Gold Medal Award winning park system. Cole specializes in biological monitoring of streams, stream restoration, and the environmental review of projects being designed and built both internally and by external agencies on parkland.


    Cole reviews plans from concept through final design to ensure that environmental impacts are limited, the design is beneficial, the goals are feasible, and construction access routes and planned construction practices are minimal. I assist project managers in designing and permitting projects to comply with Federal, State, and County environmental and forest conservation laws, policies and plans. Cole serves as the primary point of contact for question, concern, and issues from other agencies, residents, politicians and environmental advocacy groups related to environmental issues. Her section also manages both the Department's Phase II NPDES permit and its NPDES Industrial Permit as well as provides GIS support to both the Park Planning and Stewardship Division and the Department as a whole.

    Cole has taught a Freshwater Ecosystems course in the USDA Graduate School for 4 years, taught 'Fundamental Ecological Principles' for the Maryland Master Naturalist program 3 times, has presented to Montgomery County watershed groups on various topics involving Natural Resource Management and stream health and I have presented over 30 times to the Montgomery County Planning Board.

  • Assigning Value to the Financial, Environmental and Social Benefits of Nature in Urban Greenspaces

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session to learn how the Houston Park and Recreation Department's Natural Resource Management Program used a pilot project to assign value to the economic, environmental and social impact of restoring a natural-area park meant to inform the future development of city parks.

    Cities throughout the country experience competing interests for available parkland and the need to support economic development; so, the benefits of park natural areas often are overlooked. Houston, Texas, specifically, has a rapidly increasing population with various user groups demanding an increase in recreational amenities in parks. In addition, the area’s flooding challenges have led other city departments to target existing parkland for the construction of large flood-detention areas. The Houston Parks and Recreation Department’s Natural Resources Management Program worked with McMac Cx and Autocase to analyze the triple-bottom-line, cost-benefit analysis of restoring or developing a degraded 50-acre natural-area park through a pilot project meant to inform future development within city parks. Results showed that the restoration case would net more than $2 million in combined financial, social, and environmental benefits compared to the base case and nearly $30 million compared to the recreation case over a 50-year period.



    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Assess why full People, Plant, and Profit cost disclosure matters.
    2. Analyze the monetization of environmental, social, and financial alternative impacts when developing natural areas.
    3. Assess how a cost-benefit analysis of park projects supports habitat preservation.

     


    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Kelli Ondracek

    Natural Resources Manager

    Houston Parks and Recreation Department

    David MacLean

    Founder

    McMac Cx

    Eric Bill

    Vice President Economics

    Impact Infrastructure