2020 NRPA Virtual Comprehensive Bundle

The 2020 NRPA Virtual education sessions provide an inspirational approach to professional development for Park and Recreation professionals.  Register for this comprehensive package of the 2020 education sessions and join the discussions on innovation, social equity, and the essential roles you serve to positively impact communities. This bundle is packaged to provide over 5.0 CEU upon completion by including the full education sessions plus, all Speed Sessions (0.68 CEU eligible) are included for no additional cost.  

Total eligible CEU upon completion: 5.18



NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

  • What Makes a GREAT Day at Work?: The 3 Cs of Work Satisfaction

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual Conference session to discover what makes a great day at work and learn more about the three "Cs" which can help to create ideal "Great day" conditions.

    At times during your career, perhaps while driving home (or before falling asleep) you likely have reflected back at the end of the workday and thought to yourself, "Now that was a GREAT day at work!" Ever wonder what made it such a great day? Has anyone ever studied this? Are there common factors to these GREAT days from which we can learn? The answer, of course, is YES and it involves the three "Cs". Just what are these magical "Cs" you ask? Discover them and how you can help to create ideal "GREAT day" conditions for your team.


    Learning Objectives 

    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand the importance of choice, competence, and connection.
    2. Promote team competence and connection.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

  • WE GOT ENGAGED!: Tips for Communicating Effectively with Your Part-Time Workforce

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session for a deep dive into tackling the challenges of effectively communicating with large numbers of part-time employees in an efficient way and in a manner that encourages collaboration, mentorship, cross-training, and employee development.

    This session will focus on tackling the challenges of effectively communicating with large numbers of part-time employees in an efficient manner that encourages collaboration, mentorship, cross-training and employee development. Attendees will learn about the benefits of creating a part-time advisory council, embracing the unique talents found in a diverse department, while exposing the part-time workforce to the varied and wide-ranging careers that can be found under the parks and recreation umbrella. Interactive discussion topics will include lessons learned from an array of communication and efficiency barriers, best practices suggestions for managing today's part-time employee, and tips for how to prepare for the future of increased service demands balanced with staffing challenges.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Effectively communicate with diverse and spread-out part-time staff complements.
    2. Create a productive part-time leadership council.
    3. Become more efficient with time and resources while building morale and improving employee relations.

     

    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content

    Adam Blackmore

    Recreation Superintendent

    City of Henderson Public Works, Parks and Recreation

    Adam is the Recreation Superintendent with the City of Henderson Department of Public Works, Parks & Recreation in Henderson, Nevada. In this role he oversees all Recreation Division operations including aquatic operations of 10 facilities, outdoor recreation, city special events, youth and adult programming, senior services and recreation center operations for 8 centers. The position manages 65 full-time employees and 500-1,000 part-time staff depending on the season.  He previously served as the President of the Nevada Recreation and Park Society and was on the Southern Nevada Children’s Drowning Prevention Coalition Board of Directors. Blackmore has been in the recreation industry for 12 years working in both the public and private sectors, respectively. Current certifications include National Recreation & Park Association Certified Parks & Recreation Executive (CPRE) and National Swimming Pool Foundation Certified Pool Operator. Previously he held the positions of Director of Water Resort Operations with CoCo Key Water Resorts and Assistant Aquatics Manager for Plainfield, IN Parks and Recreation. Blackmore received his Master of Arts degree in Sports Management from Indiana State University and holds a Bachelor of Science in Recreation Administration from Missouri Western State University. He has presented at the National Recreation & Park Association Congress on multiple occasions, the World Waterpark Association Symposium, Association of Aquatics Professionals Conference and the Nevada Recreation and Park Society annual conference.

  • Why Parks and Recreation Are Key Factors in the Support of Mental Health Initiatives

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session for an overview of the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and its efforts in providing resources and support, both nationally and locally, for those who experience mental health challenges.

    Mental health issues throughout the United States continue to be a growing problem. The park and recreation field can play a significant role in offering services and support for those who experience challenges. Research has indicated the benefits individuals derive from a walk in the woods, working out, riding a bike or practicing mindfulness, among the myriad services we offer. The session will provide an overview about the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) and its efforts in providing resources and support, both nationally and locally. NAMI can provide a variety of support services for individuals of all ages. In addition, the session will share details of best practice park and recreation agencies that are working in partnerships or offering their own programs in support of improving the wellness and emotional health of individuals in their communities. Discuss how to get started to become a leader in your community.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Discuss mental health issues and statistics related to mental health challenges in the United States.
    2. List examples of worldwide efforts of cities, towns, and park and recreation agencies offering in support of providing resources for mental health challenges.

     



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Barbara Heller

    Why Parks and Recreation Are Key Factors in the Support of Mental Health Initiatives

    BerryDunn

    Barbara Heller has 40 years of industry experience, including 30 years working for park and recreation agencies and 12 years as a consultant in the field, focusing on strategy, organizational development, leadership development and best practices related to knowledge management and measuring organizational performance.

    April Chambers

    Vice President,

    National Alliance for Mental Illness

    Vice President and Treasurer for the Florida National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI). Presenter and Trainor: Presenter for Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) training for Law Enforcement and Corrections Officers.  Course focuses on sensitivity training and techniques for successfully communicating with individuals in psychosis.  Instructor for one of NAMI’s premier programs, Ending the Silence, designed exclusively for high school and college students encouraging them to share their thoughts and struggles with mental health issues.

  • Equity: The Case for Redlining the Term ‘Social’ and Getting Comfortable with ‘Racial’

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session to learn strategies for gathering the appropriate data to ensure that the predominant race and income of an area does not predict the quality and/or quantity of its parks and that parks in diverse, low-income areas best reflect the community needs in that area.

    Why "racial," not "social" equity? While wealth is a major driver in outcomes, the race is the stronger predictor. When studies control for income, racial disparities remain key factors in health, education, employment, and incarceration. Racial equity strategies are currently a major focus of parks departments in large, diverse, urban cities. Parks departments — such as the Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, New York City Parks, Los Angeles County Parks, and Recreation, San Francisco Recreation and Parks, Minneapolis Park and Recreation Board, and Portland (Oregon) Parks and Recreation — are developing equity initiatives to ensure that their parks are focusing resources that best serve these changing demographics. Creating a racial equity strategy provides a framework, tools, and resources that also can create social equity solutions. During this session, you will learn strategies for gathering the appropriate data to ensure that the predominant race and income of an area does not predict the quality and/or quantity of its parks and that parks in diverse, low-income areas best reflect the community needs in that area.

    Learning Objectives:
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Identify how studies have determined that race is the major driver of outcomes.
    2. Understand how major park systems are changing to serve a more diverse demographic.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Jai Cole

    Natural Resources Manager

    Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Montgomery Parks

    Jai Cole has 15 years of experience in Park and Recreation and is currently the Natural Resources Manager for M-NCPPC, Montgomery County Department of Parks. Cole supervises Natural Resources staff in Montgomery Parks who are tasked to manages the stewardship of 457 miles of streams, 26,000 acres of forest and more than 500 lakes, ponds and stormwater management facilities and devices in the 38,000 acre 5 time NRPA Gold Medal Award winning park system. Cole specializes in biological monitoring of streams, stream restoration, and the environmental review of projects being designed and built both internally and by external agencies on parkland.


    Cole reviews plans from concept through final design to ensure that environmental impacts are limited, the design is beneficial, the goals are feasible, and construction access routes and planned construction practices are minimal. I assist project managers in designing and permitting projects to comply with Federal, State, and County environmental and forest conservation laws, policies and plans. Cole serves as the primary point of contact for question, concern, and issues from other agencies, residents, politicians and environmental advocacy groups related to environmental issues. Her section also manages both the Department's Phase II NPDES permit and its NPDES Industrial Permit as well as provides GIS support to both the Park Planning and Stewardship Division and the Department as a whole.

    Cole has taught a Freshwater Ecosystems course in the USDA Graduate School for 4 years, taught 'Fundamental Ecological Principles' for the Maryland Master Naturalist program 3 times, has presented to Montgomery County watershed groups on various topics involving Natural Resource Management and stream health and I have presented over 30 times to the Montgomery County Planning Board.

  • What Happens When the World’s Most Powerful Navy Stays at Home

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session and learn how the Navy MWR responded to communities hit hard by COVID-19 by encouraging members located on 70 bases from around the world to "Stay active/Stay informed/Stay connected" by accessing the resources found on the "Navy MWR at Home" website and other platforms.

    COVID-19 hit our Navy communities hard. People were mandated to stay home, basic services were closed and people were searching for a recreation outlet. Navy MWR responded by encouraging community members located on 70 bases from around the world to "Stay active/Stay informed/Stay connected" by accessing the resources on the "Navy MWR at Home" website and other platforms. Resource categories include Cooking, Entertainment, Fitness, Kids, Library, Recreation, Virtual Travel, Social Services, and more. The entire MWR team provided content for worldwide virtual programs and resource opportunities. The Navy MWR Esports Program was created in real-time to provide sailors opportunities through competitive sports using video games. There were 12 tournaments scheduled over 10 weeks, and the tournaments were broadcast live on the newly created Navy MWR Twitch channel. The tournaments drew a crowd of more than 1.55 million live views and corporate sponsorship was secured to offset the costs.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand the process used for rethinking program delivery, on a global scale.
    2. Develop real-time partnerships to create programming and support program delivery costs.
    3. Understand how a “community” spread around the world, can be unified through virtual programming.

     

    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Refugio Orozco

    Marketing Director

    Navy

    Brooke Haley

    Community Recreation Program Manager

    Navy MWR

  • Using Park Master Plans to Drive Equity Goals

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session for a deep dive on using master plans to encourage and drive equity goals. This session will provide key practices for creating a system-wide park master plan that advances fair and just access to high-quality parks using case study examples.

    A system-wide park master plan is a tool that can help us understand the history and current barriers to park access and set a vision and plan to remove these inequities and ensure parks and open spaces are providing the most benefit to communities. This session will provide key practices for creating a system-wide park master plan that advances fair and just access to high-quality parks. The session will then dive into helpful case studies to give attendees practical examples.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    • TBD.
    • TBD.
    • TBD.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Rachel Banner

    Director of Park Access

    National Recreation and Park Association

    Rachel Banner leads the 10-Minute Walk Campaign at the National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA), where she designs strategy and manages a team to deliver training, technical assistance, grants, research, evaluation and communications to ensure park professionals have the tools to improve communities through equitable access to quality parks. Rachel received her Master’s in Public Health from Tufts University and her BS in Exercise Science from Elon University, both focused on health equity, chronic disease prevention and the built environment.

    Diane Jones

    Recreation and Parks Manager

    University of Texas at Arlington College of Architecture and Design Jones LLC

  • Public Life Is an Essential City Service: Reimagining Recreation and Parks as Integral to the Development of Your City

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This 2020 Virtual session will guide learners through the community co-creation process used to create the Office of Integrated Development (OID) in Akron, Ohio, and how the Division of Recreation and Parks leads on development within the city.

    In the summer of 1968, American cities experienced riots and unrest sparked by centuries of racial discrimination. Akron, Ohio, was no different. In response, the city of Akron leaders convened a task force to recommend pathways toward a more equitable community. Investment in recreation and parks were top priorities and municipal leaders at the time responded. It had been 40 years since the city last reviewed that plan when Akron Mayor Dan Horrigan launched a plan to unify all municipal departments that impact development. Through that process, a reinvigorated Division of Recreation and Parks joined planning, engineering, development to form the Office of Integrated Development (OID). This session will guide participants through the community co-creation process used to create OID, and how the Division of Recreation and Parks leads to development within the city.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Compare their own organizational structure to OID and evaluate if a similar structure would benefit their organization.
    2. Develop an understanding of how strong recreation and parks align with city economic development goals.
    3. Demonstrate an appreciation for the power of co-creation and community engagement in strategic planning that participants can apply in their organization.




    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Brittany Schmoekel

    Recreation and Parks Manager

    City of Akron

    Brittany Schmoekel has more than 17 years of experience with the city of Akron, Ohio, in the Recreation and Parks division. She speaks often to community groups and organizations about the revitalization and restructuring of the division and the focus they have on public space and public life that encourage deeper connections within the community.

    James Hardy

    Deputy Mayor for Integrated Development, Akron, Ohio

    City of Akron

    James Hardy is Deputy Mayor for Integrated Development for the City of Akron, Ohio.  In this role he manages planning and urban design functions, economic development, recreation and parks, downtown operations, and elements of engineering.  He previously served as Chief of Staff to Mayor Daniel Horrigan, and is a 2020-21 Fulcrum Fellow at the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy's Center for Community Investment.

  • Let’s Talk About Loneliness: Identifying and Addressing Loneliness in Our Communities

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session and gain exposure to the research on loneliness, learn about evidenced-based screening tools and interventions, and identify how parks and recreation can partner with healthcare organizations to address loneliness in our communities.

    Do you suspect that people in your community lack companionship, feel left out, or feel isolated from others? If you answered “sometimes” or “often” to those questions, they may be experiencing loneliness. You may have heard about the loneliness problem in recent articles and news publications. One in 3 adults and 1 in 5 school-aged children are affected by loneliness. Loneliness isn't about being alone, but rather about not feeling connected. People can feel lonely even when among family and friends. Research shows that loneliness has a similar health impact to smoking 15 cigarettes a day. It is evident that loneliness is a health problem in our community and parks and recreation are well-positioned to be a part of the solution. In this session, gain exposure to the research on loneliness, learn about evidenced-based screening tools and interventions, and identify how parks and recreation can partner with healthcare organizations to address loneliness in our communities.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Access research on loneliness and access evidenced-based screening tools. 
    2. Identify interventions to treat loneliness and learn about the Colorado Loneliness Project.
    3. Understand how parks and recreation can partner with healthcare organizations to address loneliness.




    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Stacey Halvorsen

    Director of Health Education and Community Outreach

    Westminster Medical Clinic

    Stacey Halvorsen has a Masters of Education and has been teaching for more than 14 years. As an ACE  -certified health coach, Halvorsen provides health coaching to patients, oversees employee wellness initiatives, and manages community partnerships and education programs. She currently serves on the NRPA Health and Wellness Advisory Panel and as a subject matter expert for the American Council on Exercise.

  • ‘Become The Agent of Change’: How Leaders Create Staff Excellence Through Inspirational Change

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this entertaining and informative program from the 2020 Virtual event, to hear how park and recreation professionals can effectively implement, lead, and navigate people through the uncertainties of organizational change or disruptions in their communities.

    Are the changes in today's world an opportunity for prosperity or pain in the neck? Many leaders of today are struggling with how to direct change while benefiting from it. When it comes to change, there are many challenges from how we get started, to how the change will be perceived by the public and embraced by your teams. In this entertaining and informative program, we will discuss how park and recreation professionals can effectively implement, lead, and navigate people through the uncertainties of organizational change or disruptions in their communities.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand a change management blueprint for implementing an organizational change.
    2. Engage more strategically resilience to manage organizational change.
    3. Apply strategies and techniques for change management and team performance improvement.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Johnny Campbell

    CEO, The Transition Man

    Speak On IT

  • There’s an Octopus in the Parking Garage?! ‘Futureproof’ Your Parks for Resiliency to Climate Change

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Join this 2020 Virtual session for an overview of how climate change will be affecting parks and recreation departments, what jurisdictions around the country are doing to be more resilient, and how you can describe these changes and their effects on elected officials and the public.

    With the election upon us, one topic that is often discussed is climate change and its dramatic effects on communities all over the world. Increased flooding, drought, expanding ranges of non-native invasive species, access to clean water, and changes in the growing season are just a few impacts that show that this isn't just a coastal problem. Resiliency is another term often used, but what is resiliency and why should you be thinking about it when developing/redeveloping parks? Making decisions regarding the location of parkland, the use of those lands, the placement of infrastructure, and overall park design will be critical in the coming decades. This discussion will give you a good idea of how climate change will be affecting parks and recreation departments, what jurisdictions around the country are doing to be more resilient, and how you describe these changes and their effects to elected officials and the public.


    Learning Objectives
    Following this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Understand how climate change is affecting communities and parklands.
    2. Identify practical steps to "futureproof" parks for long-term sustainability, recreational use, natural resource protection, and climate change mitigation.
    3. Discuss how parklands assist municipalities with resilience.



    NRPA Education online learning content is accessible for 180 days from the date of your registration. The learning content is available for registration for one year from the date of origination.

    Chris Matthews

    Division Director

    Mecklenburg County Parks and Recreation

    Chris Matthews is the division director for nature preserves and natural resources for Mecklenburg County Park and Recreation in North Carolina. He has a Bachelor of Arts degree in biology and a Master of Science degree in applied ecology and conservation biology. His professional interests include habitat restoration, fisheries, stream restoration and protected species management. Matthews speaks regularly at NRPA Annual Conferences and instructed at the NRPA Green School.

    Jai Cole

    Natural Resources Manager

    Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Montgomery Parks

    Jai Cole has 15 years of experience in Park and Recreation and is currently the Natural Resources Manager for M-NCPPC, Montgomery County Department of Parks. Cole supervises Natural Resources staff in Montgomery Parks who are tasked to manages the stewardship of 457 miles of streams, 26,000 acres of forest and more than 500 lakes, ponds and stormwater management facilities and devices in the 38,000 acre 5 time NRPA Gold Medal Award winning park system. Cole specializes in biological monitoring of streams, stream restoration, and the environmental review of projects being designed and built both internally and by external agencies on parkland.


    Cole reviews plans from concept through final design to ensure that environmental impacts are limited, the design is beneficial, the goals are feasible, and construction access routes and planned construction practices are minimal. I assist project managers in designing and permitting projects to comply with Federal, State, and County environmental and forest conservation laws, policies and plans. Cole serves as the primary point of contact for question, concern, and issues from other agencies, residents, politicians and environmental advocacy groups related to environmental issues. Her section also manages both the Department's Phase II NPDES permit and its NPDES Industrial Permit as well as provides GIS support to both the Park Planning and Stewardship Division and the Department as a whole.

    Cole has taught a Freshwater Ecosystems course in the USDA Graduate School for 4 years, taught 'Fundamental Ecological Principles' for the Maryland Master Naturalist program 3 times, has presented to Montgomery County watershed groups on various topics involving Natural Resource Management and stream health and I have presented over 30 times to the Montgomery County Planning Board.